Router Bit Depth Setting In Collet - Router Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 08:01 AM Thread Starter
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Default Router Bit Depth Setting In Collet

I've been reading about O rings etc.
I got a Musclechuck type 2 for Dewalt 625 yesterday but am having to return as router bit hardly above router table fully wound up.
I then read the following at,

Router bit shank install depth

"As a matter of fact, it is virtually impossible to bottom out a router bit in a Festool OF1400 or OF2200 router. The OF1400 has a spindle depth of 2.25" and the OF2200 has a spindle depth of 3.5". So it will be very rare that you will find a router bit with a shank long enough to bottom out in these routers.
The bottom line is that there is no reason to ever fully insert a router bit into a any router. Once the bit extends into the collet enough to be fully gripped by the collet, inserting it any deeper will not make it grip any better.
So the only decision a woodworker needs to make regarding how deep to insert the bit, is how much of the shank they need/want exposed above the collet. This relates to the stability of the bit, not about the gripping power of the collet."

The following is what I'd like to know?

" For a 1/2" shank bit, it hardly matters how much shank is exposed. It will be very stable at any depth as long as the collet clamping surfaces are fully engaged. (For Festool collets, this is 1" insertion.) 1/4" shanks are a little less rigid, but then the cutting heads are also smaller.

So the really simple answer is, stop inserting your bits so deep! Base your insertion depth on how big the cutter is and how thick the shank is.

For most router bits, 1" insertion is sufficient. For large panel raisers and profile cutters, leave enough shank exposed to not cause you other problems. "

I don't have a Festool collet I have an Axminster Collet extension, so rather than fathing about with O rings at bottom of collet or on shaft. Will I be OK with just 1 inch of router shank inserted into the collet. This approach seems much simpler than 1/16, 1/8 or 1/4 inch gap trying to use O rings.
Obviously I don't want the bit working loose.
Thanks.

Last edited by Gaia; 11-22-2018 at 08:03 AM.
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 08:24 AM
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Some time ago I carried out a lot of research concerning insertion depth of router bits. During this research I contacted all major router manufacturers and examined as many routers as I could get my hands on and the definitive answer "beyond 1" serves no purpose at all" 1" was the length of all the collets that I examined. The armature shaft of the Makita 3612/C has a VERY deep hole and so a plastic rod is supplied so the bits don't get lost inside!
This simple jig makes it easy to fit "O" rings on each bit so no guesswork is involved.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 11:40 AM
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what does the manufacturer say???
better bits have a depth set mark/line on the shank...
insert the bit slightly more than the collet is long..

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 12:16 PM
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Once you have the bit to the bottom of the collet there is nothing more to be gained. So if you remove the collet and measure it's length then that is the minimum insertion length for the bit shaft. It will be somewhere between about 19 and 25mm (my DeWalt 610 collet is only .7 something of an inch long). That's a clever little jig Harry made for keeping small straight bits from falling through.

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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 02:22 PM
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As a point of reference, I just checked a Musclechuck collet and it is 1 5/16” from the top rim to the bottom of the collet. Assume then that the shank should be inserted accordingly. To follow Stick’s suggestion that would be at least 1 3/8”.

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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 02:24 PM
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correct...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 03:20 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
what does the manufacturer say???
better bits have a depth set mark/line on the shank...
insert the bit slightly more than the collet is long..
Looking at their web site, no info but there is a mark on shank which I take to be the depth.
Thanks.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 03:21 PM Thread Starter
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OK thanks everyone.
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 03:39 PM
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Way back I found out my bits climbed because they bottomed out - real old Ryobi router. Was told if I raised my bit about 1/8" they would not climb, which proved to be true. So, now I just let the bits go as deep as they can go, raise them up about 1/8" or so, tighten the collet, and no problems.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 03:52 PM
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Peter if you look at the MC you'll notice that the screw that clamps it to the bit is near the top end of the MC. This is different than the slotted collet in a forcing cone type design that is the norm for standard collets. One of the reasons for making sure the bit is at least to the lower end of a standard collet is to ensure you don't damage it by having it squeeze together with nothing to restrain it from going too far. As long as a bit is past the tightening screw on the MC a little ways then it shouldn't damage the MC. Certainly the more shaft inserted, the better the holding power would be but if you stopped at the 1 inch insertion mark that should be good enough.

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