Is this Safe - Router Forums
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 12:18 PM Thread Starter
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I'm building a router table based on the Pat Warner's design as shown in his "The Router Table CD." I'll have the same type of mortice and tenons to attach the rails to the legs and use the same technique (MDF lifts as in the pictures). My concern is that 4 of the mortices that are on the face of the legs (2 for the top rails and 2 for the bottom rails) are away from the fence, while the other 4 are on the edge. The ones on the edge are ok. It's the ones on the face that is my concern. They will be 1-3/8" away from the fence. The ones closest to the fence are only 1/2" away. Is it safe to cut the ones on the face away from the fence a safe thing to do? I've read about not trapping the work between the fence and the cutter but I'm not sure if it applies only to cutting on the edge of the piece but also to slots. I have his acrylic morticer which I could make the face mortices without a problem.

Thanks for the advice.
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 01:41 PM
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I'm afraid I can't visualize what you mean Orlando.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 02:07 PM Thread Starter
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Chuck, look at the second picture and look at the mortice on the face of the stick. If you lay the stick flat, the mortice was cut with the majority of the stick against the fence. Is this considered trapping the work between the cutter and the work piece or is it a safe operation.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 02:09 PM
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I am not sure how you are going to make a mortise with that bit, it looks like the bearing is larger diameter than the cutter. If the bearing is removed cutting that much material at one pass is risky too. At times it is OK to feed from left to right if the material is trapped against the fence, because you will be feeding the material against the rotation of the bit. I would use some feather boards too and make incremental cuts.
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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Herb, that thing sticking up is a shoulder bolt that prevents the MDF from slipping. The cutter is a 3/8" diameter with a 1-1/4" flute length and is under the stick. The depth of cut is 1-1/4" done in 1/4" increments by removing one of the 1/4" lifts as you go. So in the picture only 1/4" of the bit is exposed since there four 1/4" lifts still in the table.
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 04:30 PM
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Trapping is when the bit is on the other side of the board from the fence. What can make this dangerous is that with a straight bit there is nothing to control how much wood the bit is feeding into. The board can get pulled by the bit action away from the fence and you lose control. With the bit at least partially behind the fence face depth of cut is controlled. If you are trying to make a slotted mortise into the face of the fence then I would clamp a stop on the fence and hold the end of the board against it and swing the other end of the board into the fence. You'd be able to stay in control that way.

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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 05:12 PM
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@OBG65 .Did you mean"trapping the work piece between the cutter & the fence?"Raising the bit in 1/4inch increments as you are doing & taking your time is fine as I see it.
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 05:33 PM Thread Starter
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Chuck, it's not a slotted mortice but one like in the picture.
jj - thanks for the input and advice.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OBG65 View Post
Herb, that thing sticking up is a shoulder bolt that prevents the MDF from slipping. The cutter is a 3/8" diameter with a 1-1/4" flute length and is under the stick. The depth of cut is 1-1/4" done in 1/4" increments by removing one of the 1/4" lifts as you go. So in the picture only 1/4" of the bit is exposed since there four 1/4" lifts still in the table.
Thanks for clarifying. I have never seen or used that type of operation with removing layers of boards to set depth of cuts.
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 08:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
Thanks for clarifying. I have never seen or used that type of operation with removing layers of boards to set depth of cuts.
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My pleasure. It's something I got from Pat Warner's books. His rationale was that instead of making a number of height adjustments (mostly going up) to arrive at your desired depth, you could arrive at your desired depth without making height adjustments by setting the cutter height at the depth you want, having a series of lifts, and remove one at a time. I would surmise that the thickness is arbitrary anywhere from 1/4" - 3/4" and possibly even mix-matching them. He used MDF and in one book I saw them out of acrylic which probably provides more thickness options than MDF, is flatter, and more durable.
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