The Router Workshop router table - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 02:54 PM
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The push block is also the way I do it. For things like rail and stile ends or rabbeting I made a right angle arm that slides along the edge of my table. If you want blow out protection you add a narrow strip behind the piece.

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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 08:31 PM
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Art - I get what you're saying and that works for you. I just never found the need for a miter slot on the table. I use a push block when doing rail and style.
Check out this video at the 5:00 minute mark - that's the method I use. There are different ways of doing things, so we each pick the method that works FOR US.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHnLvps8968
Vince, I get your point regarding the type of work shown in the Sommerfeld video, but how do you deal with longish thin stock? That is where I have been using horizontal (table T-slot) and vertical ( fence T-slot) mounted feather boards, but I am interested in better ways to do it. Thanks.
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 08:37 PM
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Biagio - for long thin stock, I use two feather boards with each mounted on either side of the bit on the fence, to hold the work down. I have a miter slot milled into my fence. This keeps the work from tipping at either end. If needed I use a push block to push the work against the fence to keep it from creeping away from the fence. I posted pictures of my fence on this forum some time ago, but that was before I milled a slot, and I don't have an up-to-date picture to post at this time.

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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 08:39 PM
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The push block is also the way I do it. For things like rail and stile ends or rabbeting I made a right angle arm that slides along the edge of my table. If you want blow out protection you add a narrow strip behind the piece.
Charles, pardon my ignorance. What is the advantage of the right angle arm over the push block for cope and stick, and when would you choose it over the push block? I made a T-slot coping sled years ago, but found it more trouble than it was worth.
Anything that requires setting the fence parallel to the table T-slot, takes me an inordinate amount of time, so am always keen to find a better way.
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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by vchiarelli View Post
Biagio - for long thin stock, I use two feather boards with each mounted on either side of the bit on the fence, to hold the work down. I have a miter slot milled into my fence. This keeps the work from tipping at either end. If needed I use a push block to push the work against the fence to keep it from creeping away from the fence. I posted pictures of my fence on this forum some time ago, but that was before I milled a slot, and I don't have an up-to-date picture to post at this time.
Thanks, Vince. Do you use more than one push block on a longish piece,I.e. near the front and at the back? That is when I find the horizontal feather boards useful.
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2019, 09:24 PM
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Biagio - no, generally one push block near the bit on the infeed side and push with my other hand or a push block with the rubber backing

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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-15-2019, 03:52 AM Thread Starter
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I didn’t mean to start a war. Sorry.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-15-2019, 07:45 AM
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Vince, I get your point regarding the type of work shown in the Sommerfeld video, but how do you deal with longish thin stock? That is where I have been using horizontal (table T-slot) and vertical ( fence T-slot) mounted feather boards, but I am interested in better ways to do it. Thanks.
That's the whole point of having miter and t slots. Without feather boards you're making your life a lot more complicated and dangerous. It's so simple to adjust the feather board to keep the wood snug against the fence. It also allows you to keep both hands on the stock as you feed it through. The ability to use a miter gauge is a bonus but not the most important thing. I learned the importance of feather boards over 50 years ago when I ruined a piece of antique wood that was essential. The project couldn't be completed for the lack of one stinking piece of molding. I too am always interested in new and better ways of doing things. But the keyword is better. If someone wants to spend a few bucks to eliminate the featherboards then there is always the JessEm clear cut guides. But for those of you out there just starting out at least use featherboards . Or not it's up to you.

https://www.infinitytools.com/jessem...All%20Products
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