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post #11 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 05:12 PM
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Instead of sealing the MDF, try a double layer of plywood, preferably Baltic Birch, Glue and clamp them together using cawls, flat lumber spans the plywood, clamps go on the ends to apply pressure evenly across the plywood. Cut an opening big enough for the base of the router in the second layer, or if you are going to use a metal mounting plate, cut the opening about half an inch inside the shape and size of the plate. You can then use screws through the seond layer to level the plate with the top. Cut the top opening the exact size of the plate, PLUS about the thickness of a playing card more or you'll never get the plate out.

I have attached a couple of images of a fence made from ply that are pretty cool. The first drawing is the offset, but slightly different than the simple double layer because you would cut a rebate or rabbet edge slightly deeper than the thickness of your plate.

The second is a Kreg leveling device you may be able to get over there. Or you can drill throught he second layer and fit a screw up through the bottom. File off the sharp end if you wish. Not expensive here, but easy to install, and you can cut the opening the full size, no lip is needed using it.

Glad you decided to jump in. The most important part of learing woodworking is to make stuff yourself. You'll learn from each project you do.

BTW, get yourself a dust mask when working with power tools. The router throws off a LOT of sawdust and it's not good for you. Take and post a picture of your table when it's done.

I have also posted a pdf of the 18 things I've learned over the past decade that accelerated my learning curve. It's about USA gear, but most of it applies to the UK, just different model numbers and brands.
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post #12 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
I like the key shaped plate, Theo. K.I.S.S. in pictures!
Yeah, I do too, no movement at all. And still not sure how I made it, let alone get it so precise. I think it is because I used three pieces for the top. I made a master of it, and cloned about 5 more plates, and they all fit perfectly, just drop right in.
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post #13 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 04:50 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
Glad you decided to jump in. The most important part of learing woodworking is to make stuff yourself. You'll learn from each project you do.

BTW, get yourself a dust mask when working with power tools. The router throws off a LOT of sawdust and it's not good for you. Take and post a picture of your table when it's done.

I have also posted a pdf of the 18 things I've learned over the past decade that accelerated my learning curve. It's about USA gear, but most of it applies to the UK, just different model numbers and brands.
Well, I'm still not entirely convinced that making one myself right away is such a good idea, but I guess we'll see soon

I work with a lot of horn, antler and bone as well as small pieces of exotic woods for jewellery so the importance of good dust extraction is not lost on me. Thanks for the PDF as well, some useful stuff there that I hadn't thought of.

Tryin' Hard
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post #14 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 05:24 AM
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Default Shop built router table

The attachment includes some appropriate pages from a Shop Notes article which you may find interesting. All 95 issues are available for free download - I tried to include a link to them but was told I had to complete 10 posts before I could post urls . . .
Hope you're inspired to build your own table!
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post #15 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 05:27 AM
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Hmmmm - I uploaded a .pdf but it seems to have dropped off somewhere in the ether. It's those pesky foreigners again!
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post #16 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 07:41 AM
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I wish I wasn’t so intimidated by making one at the beginning, as I wouldn’t even consider buying one now . I’d buy a lift and build a router table and have multiple fences . Kinda late ,as I have all the parts now .
There is nothing to be intimidated about. It's just a board with a hole in it. You don't need a fence or a plate just a hole and a something flat to push your wood against. Find a place that makes laminated countertops and they will probably give you a sink cut out for free. Once you get the hang of using a table you'll most likely seldom if ever take your router off the table. You don't need a fancy fence because 99.9 percent of the time you will never need a micro adjuster you'll push the fence up to the bearing and leave it there. As far as the fence just cut a hole in it big enough for the bit to fit through. Then add a second split fence so that you can slide both sides wider or narrower depending on the bit size.
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post #17 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 09:17 AM
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Jon it sounds like you'll be doing mostly small projects so Art's suggestion is a good one. A sink cut out would make an ideal small table. The high pressure laminate cover is perfect for a table because it's durable and very smooth. Most of us add HPL to our larger tables for that reason. In fact, I use a sink cut out on the bed of my planer (thicknesser to you) because wood slides on it better than it does on the steel bed. You just need to cut a hole out for the router and add a set of legs under it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #18 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 09:49 AM
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...put legs under it...

Nice to leave your table set up, which is why I suggest browsing thrift shops for a piece of furniture or table you can use to hold the router up. Cheap and easy solution. Use the existing top as the second layer to create the plate shelf, then the laminate on top of that, cut to the size of the plate. Voila, pretty much done. Probably last, oh, a lifetime, particularly if you use a plate. You'll need a jig saw and a drill, which cost is offset by your savings over an "official" router table and stand. You'll gain some confidence too.

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post #19 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
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Jon it sounds like you'll be doing mostly small projects so Art's suggestion is a good one. A sink cut out would make an ideal small table. The high pressure laminate cover is perfect for a table because it's durable and very smooth. Most of us add HPL to our larger tables for that reason. In fact, I use a sink cut out on the bed of my planer (thicknesser to you) because wood slides on it better than it does on the steel bed. You just need to cut a hole out for the router and add a set of legs under it.
I'm going to ask around locally to see if I can scrounge a bit of work surface from somewhere.

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...put legs under it...

Nice to leave your table set up, which is why I suggest browsing thrift shops for a piece of furniture or table you can use to hold the router up. Cheap and easy solution. Use the existing top as the second layer to create the plate shelf, then the laminate on top of that, cut to the size of the plate. Voila, pretty much done. Probably last, oh, a lifetime, particularly if you use a plate. You'll need a jig saw and a drill, which cost is offset by your savings over an "official" router table and stand. You'll gain some confidence too.
It's going to have to have legs unfortunately. I simply don't have the room to leave it set up permanently otherwise an old chest of drawers or something similar would be a stonking idea. Sadly however it's going to have to share the workmate with my band saw. It means I'll have to plan my work carefully as I really don't enjoy shifting the band saw around too often, but then, in my case at least, being forced to do a bit of planning is probably no bad thing I've already got jigsaws and drills, so no issues there and I will definitely be bearing the furniture idea in mind for future expansion.

Tryin' Hard

Last edited by mr happymoose; 07-30-2019 at 11:07 AM.
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post #20 of 54 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 10:59 AM
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might be some ideas here...

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Build an Economy Router Table Top.pdf (177.7 KB, 10 views)
File Type: pdf crestonwoodplans.pdf (2.45 MB, 7 views)
File Type: pdf One-weekend Router Table.pdf (826.7 KB, 9 views)
File Type: pdf quick-and-easy-router-table.pdf (824.3 KB, 7 views)
File Type: pdf Router Table Dust Collection Concept V.4.pdf (78.4 KB, 9 views)
File Type: pdf the-table-saw-router-fence-021415.pdf (1,002.9 KB, 7 views)
File Type: pdf Venting a router table's motor with DC....pdf (85.8 KB, 8 views)
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