ogee molding on a table - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-22-2009, 09:31 PM Thread Starter
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Default ogee molding on a table

I am making a door and am trying to make ogee classical molding not only for looks but to hold the inside panels in place. I dont want to dado a groove for the panels. Just my preference. I am going to have the molding hold the panels in from both sides. I got a classical bit in the mail today and it is not exactly the the profile I wanted but whatever... I was playing with it in the table
... I guess you are supposed to move the fence back just enough so the ball bearing still touches the wood..???no??? any ideas on this..??
After I cut the profile I was going to saw off the piece on the table saw and pin it to the sides of th door frame. One piece on either side of the panels..
And when you put the bit in the router its supposed to be about halfway
seated in the router ,yes?? Any comments from molding makers appreciated.
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-23-2009, 07:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by rout1111 View Post
I am making a door and am trying to make ogee classical molding not only for looks but to hold the inside panels in place. I dont want to dado a groove for the panels. Just my preference. I am going to have the molding hold the panels in from both sides. I got a classical bit in the mail today and it is not exactly the the profile I wanted but whatever... I was playing with it in the table
... I guess you are supposed to move the fence back just enough so the ball bearing still touches the wood..???no??? any ideas on this..??
After I cut the profile I was going to saw off the piece on the table saw and pin it to the sides of th door frame. One piece on either side of the panels..
And when you put the bit in the router its supposed to be about halfway
seated in the router ,yes?? Any comments from molding makers appreciated.
I believe you will want more than half the shank of the bit in the collet. Usual reccomendation is seat the bit all the way, then pull it back out just a little bit, just so it is not bottomed out in the collett.
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-23-2009, 07:31 AM
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Depends on the size of the profile and how much of it you want to see. But yes, typically you would set the fence flush with the front edge of the bearing. This setting gives you the full profile of the bit. Depending on the bit size you may want to approach this profile a little at a time by moving the fence out a bit and backing it off after each pass until it's flush with the bearing. Are you holding the panel in place by mitering the moulding around it? How about rabbeting the rails and stiles, dropping the panel into the rabbet and moulding the outside? There are a few ways to approach it but the standard frame and panel construction calls for a dado.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-23-2009, 09:01 AM
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Hi rout: You can use the fence to guide the work through the router, if it's not a curved profile. In which case you place a straight edge accross the input and out put fences and it should barely touch the bearing. I find that it's easier to use wide stock and run both edges through, and then rip them down on the TS. I usually have my bits at least 2/3rds into the collet. But you can also put it in till it bottoms and then pull it out an eigth of an inch. I only insures that the collet is not hitting the fillet where the shaft meets the body of the the bit. Hope this helps.. Woodnut65
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-28-2009, 05:32 PM
 
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Most ogee bits are pretty big, so you are not going to want to do it all in one pass. You could move the fence each time or you could set the fence at the final cut depth and then clamp a couple of 1/4 inch sacrificial fences on top of that. Make your first run remove the first fence, and make another pass, and repeat. You will better cuts that way.
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