It begins.... - Page 6 - Router Forums
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post #51 of 56 (permalink) Old 04-03-2020, 07:32 PM
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Nice work Happymoose. A little hardwood trim around the edges will give it a nice finishing touch.

Perhaps it is just me, but it seems that the use of plunge routers in router tables is more common outside the USA. And use of that compact scissor lift seems popular.

Having used the early Dewalt branded version of the ELU for 20+ years, I too could have benefited from that little gem.

Enjoy.


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post #52 of 56 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 04:34 AM Thread Starter
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One other thing I have used for years is dropping a small 12mm rubber grommet into the collet so you just bottom the bit shank onto the grommet rather than drop it in and lift it 3mm
Tom I've just been having a bit of a tidy up in the garage/'shop and, while I don't have any of the right size o rings as yet, I do have a piece of rubber sheet I could easily punch a disk the right diameter out of. It's only 2mm thick though so is that 3mm dimension important or could I get away with what I have either with one disc or two making it 4mm?

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post #53 of 56 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 09:14 AM
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I've seen a design of a basic fence but with toggle clamps at either end to hold it in place. (Bad picture below, but it gives you an idea) I've used those clamps before and once they're set right, they're not going anywhere fast. Also, I have a pair on the shelf doing nothing at the moment...
Another option for fence clamps is like what I used on my table. They work surprisingly well. See pics 6 & 7. A little more info here.

Nice table already, Jon.

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post #54 of 56 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Another option for fence clamps is like what I used on my table. They work surprisingly well. See pics 6 & 7. A little more info here.

Nice table already, Jon.
Oh that is a nice idea, thanks for the tip!

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post #55 of 56 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 10:32 AM
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Good solutions and a nice table. It will be prettier with a nice edge on it. One last thing, Stick suggested fitting a hose to the bottom of the router to pull clean, filtered air into the router.

One other thing I have used for years is dropping a small 12mm rubber grommet into the collet so you just bottom the bit shank onto the grommet rather than drop it in and lift it 3mm. This allows you to use matched bits (Freud makes door sets like this), so you don't have to do trial and error fitting for rails and stiles, particularly on panel doors. Some propose putting an O ring on the shaft to limit depth into the collet, but this is too variable for matched bit sets.

What's next, a fence? I like the designs below but would make the fence much taller, or at least make a provision to add a 10-12 inch (300mm or so) bold on fence as well. You won't need a tall fence often, but using just a block of MDF and the tall fence, you can cut ends on on stiles, or even shape wide molding. The most important part of the fence is that the vertical fence must be 90 to the table, or base of te fence.

If you use Tbolts, you can cut channels into the table (front to back) so you can use star knobs to hold the fence firmly in place exactly as you want it. When adjusting, you leave one side tight, and move the other end, then cinch it in place. The fence generally does not need to be parallel to the front or rear edge of your table.

I've built a couple of fences and if you use high quality European Baltic Birch (nice and flat) and preferably a table saw, you can make something you'll use for years.

You can also get away with a really really flat piece of construction lumber, just use clamps to hold it in place. You don't want your fence to move mid cut or some serious cursing will break out.

You're doing great.

The third picture is of a router fence dust port, available online from one of several brands.
My last table had t tracks and star knobs to hold the fence in place and either 2 or 3 times I had it loosen off and ruin the piece I was working on so my newest table went back to clamping it to the table edges.

An even better option than the grommet in the bottom of the collet cone is to put an o-ring on the shank of the router bit and push it into a hole drilled 1"- 25mm in a block of wood. That's how long most collets are and that makes sure that you have the bit fully inserted into the collet while leaving you the maximum amount of bit extended. You could also put the router bit in the hole and just mark the shank with a marker too if you don't have the o-rings. You want to make sure you are using the full length of the collet but there is no advantage to having the bit go through farther than that.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.

Last edited by Cherryville Chuck; 04-05-2020 at 10:35 AM.
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post #56 of 56 (permalink) Old 04-05-2020, 10:34 AM
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I'm late with advice, but as far as the wires getting hot, loop them as tight as you plan, then run the router for 10 minutes straight, all the while monitoring the cord temperature with an infrared non contact thermometer. I'd bet after 2 minutes it will become pretty boring. I think you would have to tape the wires together to get enough heat to be concerned.
mark the shanks or use the manufactures mark...
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