Mikita 3612BR - Router Forums
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 05:32 PM Thread Starter
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Default Mikita 3612BR

My friend gave me an older Craftsman router table. I have a Mikita 3612 BR I bought 30 years ago and will be attempting to mount it in the table. Will this be possible? The table plate holes do not match router base plate holes, not a surprise. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 05:34 PM
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You’re hitting the old vs. new router designs - the older ones not having been designed for table use is all too often. not sure what you can do unless the base can be removed and modified to a lift or table plate. Prepare for an upgrade...

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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 05:56 PM
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Welcome N/A...

remove the sub-base from the Makita...
lay it on the table... the side of the plate that fixes to the router's base will be the down side...
line up the center large holes in the sub-base and table really well...
mark the screw holes...
drill the holes and countersink for FH screws...
if the table lacks thickness, epoxy flat fender washers (large OD is preferred) as needed to the under side of the table to gain thickness..
install the router base w/o the sub-base...

JUst in case N/A we've put some helpful information together at this here link to help you get up and running in the world of routers... We hope it to be useful to you... Enjoy...
do take some time and read the safety PDF's... PLEASE!!!
Blood and trips to the ER, we find, are very annoying... Not to mention – expensive...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 08:29 PM Thread Starter
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You’re referring to the hard fiber plastic disc attached to the Makita as the sub base plate, correct?
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Bunker View Post
You’re referring to the hard fiber plastic disc attached to the Makita as the sub base plate, correct?
correct...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 10:31 PM
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I had an old Sears table that was stamped steel and had the pattern for one of their routers at the time. If it's that one it's going to be hard. If it's a plastic one that came later it might be easier but you'll still need to be able to countersink the screws in.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I had an old Sears table that was stamped steel and had the pattern for one of their routers at the time. If it's that one it's going to be hard. If it's a plastic one that came later it might be easier but you'll still need to be able to countersink the screws in.
the washers (or one thick one) comp for the top's thinness and you still can CS...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-11-2020, 01:19 AM
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Quote:
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the washers (or one thick one) comp for the top's thinness and you still can CS...
The countersink holes were stamped into the metal. You'd have to be able to pound them into the surface. For most people that wouldn't be an easy job. It was a real piece of cheap crap anyway. You needed to either screw it down or clamp it down and if you pushed on it too hard it would torque the top.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-11-2020, 02:01 AM
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G'day Dave, welcome to the forum.

James
Sydney, Australia
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I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-11-2020, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
The countersink holes were stamped into the metal. You'd have to be able to pound them into the surface. For most people that wouldn't be an easy job. It was a real piece of cheap crap anyway. You needed to either screw it down or clamp it down and if you pushed on it too hard it would torque the top.
Drill the hole and install the washer(s)... (ID is the same as the screw's OD)...
CS the hole...
part of CS is in the table and washer gives you the rest of the thickness the CS requires and no dimple to contend w/...
using a large OD fender washers distribute surface tension...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
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