How long can you run a router? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 09:50 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
kweinert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 15
 
Send a message via Skype™ to kweinert
Default How long can you run a router?

It's a 2 1/4 HP Freud, mounted in an open table. I'm milling a 45 degree angle on either 3 or 4 sides of pieces that are roughly 3" square.

So, since this is a production kind of thing and I have all the pieces cut already, I can see myself running too long and burning it up. Definitely something I don't want to do.

Any suggestions?
kweinert is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 10:10 PM
Forum Contributor
 
AxlMyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 3,165
   
Default

How much are you taking off? That would be a big factor.

.
Never, under any circumstances, combine a sleeping pill and a laxative on the same night.

Mike - Retired FoMoCo Tradesman
My Gallery @ http://www.routerforums.com/axlmyks-stuff/
AxlMyk is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 10:14 PM
Registered User
 
levon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Country: United States
First Name: levon
Posts: 1,820
 
Default

i think i would have used a table saw, then cut them to length. that is if im understanding you right.

i guess that would only work on part of it?

light travels faster than sound, this is why some people seem bright til you hear them speak.

Please Please Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum

levon
levon is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 10:26 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
kweinert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 15
 
Send a message via Skype™ to kweinert
Default

The wood is 3/8" thick and I'm putting a 45 degree bevel on it, full thickness.

And I was a bit nervous about having the blade that close to my hand - for some reason the bit doesn't bother me even though I know it's rotating faster than the blade.
kweinert is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 10:40 PM
Forum Contributor
 
xplorx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 10,671
 
Default

I would think that it would run a long time unless you are taxing it too much. What kind of wood is another factor. If a hard wood and you are concerned take it down in two steps. You should be able to tell how hard it is working by the sound to some degree. I put a 45 bevel and took off 1/2" on several pieces of oak and mine was just fine, I think I could have done a lot more without overheating the router. If you think it might be getting too hot just feel it from time to time,

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

I have a very good memory, just short is all.
xplorx4 is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 11:02 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 3,046
 
Default

Freud seems to have a pretty good reputation, 3 inch pieces, 3/8 thick. I seriously doubt you will tax it very much. It will be cooling some while you change stock. I suspect you will putter out before it does. I know I would

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
jschaben is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-13-2009, 11:56 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
kweinert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 15
 
Send a message via Skype™ to kweinert
Default

I'm building 50 boxes, the bottoms are 3" square and get all 4 sides beveled and the sides are 2 5/8x3 and get the both 2 5/8 sides and one 3" side beveled.

I'll post up some pictures when I get them done (I say "I", but I'm doing the cutting, my wife is doing the finishing on this set.) Once they're cut, it's glue and blue tape to put them together.

Thanks for the advice - and after what happened on the table saw I see the utility in taking a break every now and then.
kweinert is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-15-2009, 12:06 AM
Retired Moderator
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 11,921
 
Send a message via Skype™ to Mike
Default

Ken, like a table saw the router can cause serious damage to body parts. Since you are doing a "production run" be sure to set up a finger board to hold the wood to the fence and another to hold the wood down to the table over the bit. By all means use a push stick. This type of simple job is what dulls the senses... and thats when accidents happen. In the future you might consider running long sections through the router table and then cutting them to length.

Mike
"Living in the D" (this means Detroit!)
"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"
Mike is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-15-2009, 04:39 PM
Registered User
 
CharleyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Charley
Posts: 1,997
 
Default

I fear more for your fingers than I do your router. Those pieces are way too small to be pushing through the router without putting them into some kind of handling fixture first. A 2 screw woodworkers clamp would do it, and your fingers would be much farther away from that spinny thing. Next time plan on putting as many bevels as possible on long boards and then cutting them to length before making the remaining bevel cuts, or do as much of the waste removal as possible on a saw before finishing the cut with the router. Always devise a way of keeping your fingers 3" or more away from saw blades or router bits while they are cutting/running. I think your router will handle this fine if you remove the material in several passes or remove the bulk of the material with the table saw. Making the full cut will likely cause the parts to be pulled from your fingers and both your fingers and your parts may be damaged. A for light cuts your router will likely run for hours without overheating.

CharleyL
CharleyL is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-20-2009, 07:30 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
kweinert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 15
 
Send a message via Skype™ to kweinert
Default

So I finished beveling the box parts and didn't have any safety issues. Since I had a sacrificial board on the miter slide I'm not sure how I could have used any finger boards. I did the pieces over 3 or 4 days, probably about 4 hours total router work.

Yes, I could have done one or two edges (depending on whether it was a side or bottom piece while the stock was still longer but I have a couple of questions/comments about that. My stock was about 8 to 10 feet long and that seems to me to be too long for a "normal" router table. I could have cut the pieces shorter, but when I was cutting to length I had to cut out knots and such and didn't want to waste wood.

Yes, that could have been penny wise and pound foolish.

Maybe the scary part of this is that it worked and there weren't any scary moments. I did run the pieces in batches of 15 to 20 and I would stop in between batches to stack the beveled pieces in the box, take the next set and sort out which sides would show and stack them all in the same direction, grab a drink of water, put the mask back on, etc - so it wasn't a single session of just slamming pieces through the router.

I had a couple of minor incidents when I was cutting to size on the table saw (which was done in a more sustained manner) and decided that when my fingers were closer I needed to change the way I worked.

I appreciate all your advice and concern. Just for the record, I realize that whether it's a blade with teeth or one with a cutter head they spin very fast and flesh is very fragile. It just seemed safer and more accurate to do this on the router once the pieces were cut to size.

I will look in to how to do it differently as this certainly won't be the last time I'm building boxes like this.

Thank you.
kweinert is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ridgid R2930 (fixed and plunge base routee) xplorx4 Tool Reviews 15 09-23-2014 09:15 AM
How long have you been using a Router? reible The Voting Booth 49 01-18-2012 06:50 PM
Freud FT3000VCE 3-1/4 HP Variable Speed Plunge Router Bridge General Routing 9 11-01-2010 09:18 PM
Update to -New Built Router Table Greeneyedeagle Table-mounted Routing 10 02-25-2009 09:23 PM
New here burlboy New Member Introductions 9 01-15-2009 12:53 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome