Jointing on the router table - Router Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-15-2009, 10:48 PM Thread Starter
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Default Jointing on the router table

Link to a method to do jointing on the router table:

Router Jointer - WoodWorkingBuzz.com Forums

I saw this and was wondering if anyone has any safety concerns with this method, or is it ok?

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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-15-2009, 11:03 PM
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HI rstermer

Just my 2 cents I would not recommend doing it that way. it's called trapping the stock..
One knot and the stock if off like a rocket ..only to be use by the experience router table user.. and one that can read wood grain...

=========


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Originally Posted by rstermer View Post
Link to a method to do jointing on the router table:

Router Jointer - WoodWorkingBuzz.com Forums

I saw this and was wondering if anyone has any safety concerns with this method, or is it ok?

rstermer



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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 12:02 AM Thread Starter
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HI rstermer

Just my 2 cents I would not recommend doing it that way. it's called trapping the stock..
One knot and the stock if off like a rocket ..only to be use by the experience router table user.. and one that can read wood grain...

=========
Thanks Bob- That's what I was thinking, usually when you hear the warning against trapping the stock, it is a situation where the fence is behind the bit, here it is in front, so I was wondering if the same result would occur. I'm too chicken to go out in the shop and set up an experiment to find out for sure. . .
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Last edited by rstermer; 07-16-2009 at 12:23 AM.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 04:29 AM
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Fascinating, I don't think that the method is inherently unsafe, over the years many ways have been adopted to hold the wood against the cutter and feeding from right to left there's little or no chance of the wood kicking back, I've certainly never experienced it. Now table saws, that's a whole different ball game.

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 07:09 AM
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My experience has been that it's quite safe. But, like BobJ, I'm careful of grain direction and knots. Also, my cuts are less than 1/16.

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 07:12 AM Thread Starter
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Fascinating, I don't think that the method is inherently unsafe, over the years many ways have been adopted to hold the wood against the cutter and feeding from right to left there's little or no chance of the wood kicking back, I've certainly never experienced it. Now table saws, that's a whole different ball game.
Thanks, Harry- Your table saw remark reminds me of one of my earliest experiences using the router table. One of my first projects was to make a low step stool to help my aged mother in law to get in and out of the shower. I had no experience using my newly acquired router table, but had used a table saw a bit and knew that when crosscutting, one never does so with the stock against the fence during the cut. I needed to cut a dado for the legs of the stool to fit into the top, so, using the table saw analogy, set up the fence in the router table with a spacer block and attempted to make the cut using the miter gauge which came with the router table, just like one would do on the table saw. Well, you can imagine the result, the bit grabbed the stock as I made the cut and I ended up with a nice "ess" shaped dado. By the time I realized what had happened, it was too late and the top was ruined. The second top came out a lot better. I've since learned other operations, which one routinely performs on the table saw, either shouldn't be done, or should be done entirely differently, when one switches to the router table, a consequence of the changed direction of the axis about which the cutter rotates.

Back to the question at hand. My reading of your post indicates you think that jointing can be accomplished using the technique I posted no less safely than other cuts are made on the router table. Is that fair, or amI misinterpreting your answer?

As you know, I classify myself as a beginner, and don't really know a lot, which is why I asked the question. After reading the two responses, both from persons whose opinion I respect, and who came to opposite conclusions, I'm still unsure, but I certainly appreciate you and Bobj3 taking the time to look at it.

rstermer

Last edited by rstermer; 07-16-2009 at 07:37 AM.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 11:18 AM
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Although, it's safe IMO. However, if you are not comfortable doing it, please don't.
Next to inattention, tentativeness probably causes lots of mishaps.
Gene

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 08:55 PM Thread Starter
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Although, it's safe IMO. However, if you are not comfortable doing it, please don't.
Next to inattention, tentativeness probably causes lots of mishaps.
Gene
Thanks, Gene, good advice.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 10:10 PM
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fascinating, I have tried this as well with good results. climb cut routing, just hold the piece tight...
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-16-2009, 10:32 PM
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Hi rstermer

I get all my tips from the Pro's Bob and Rick,, I don't recall seeing them do it that way,,they always do it the right way and the safe way...


Router Workshop: jointer101102

But to each his own way....I want to keep my fingers, I need them


===

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Originally Posted by rstermer View Post
Thanks, Harry- Your table saw remark reminds me of one of my earliest experiences using the router table. One of my first projects was to make a low step stool to help my aged mother in law to get in and out of the shower. I had no experience using my newly acquired router table, but had used a table saw a bit and knew that when crosscutting, one never does so with the stock against the fence during the cut. I needed to cut a dado for the legs of the stool to fit into the top, so, using the table saw analogy, set up the fence in the router table with a spacer block and attempted to make the cut using the miter gauge which came with the router table, just like one would do on the table saw. Well, you can imagine the result, the bit grabbed the stock as I made the cut and I ended up with a nice "ess" shaped dado. By the time I realized what had happened, it was too late and the top was ruined. The second top came out a lot better. I've since learned other operations, which one routinely performs on the table saw, either shouldn't be done, or should be done entirely differently, when one switches to the router table, a consequence of the changed direction of the axis about which the cutter rotates.

Back to the question at hand. My reading of your post indicates you think that jointing can be accomplished using the technique I posted no less safely than other cuts are made on the router table. Is that fair, or amI misinterpreting your answer?

As you know, I classify myself as a beginner, and don't really know a lot, which is why I asked the question. After reading the two responses, both from persons whose opinion I respect, and who came to opposite conclusions, I'm still unsure, but I certainly appreciate you and Bobj3 taking the time to look at it.

rstermer



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Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
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Last edited by bobj3; 07-16-2009 at 11:39 PM.
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