Using skis to mount router??? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-08-2009, 04:35 PM Thread Starter
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Default Using skis to mount router???

Hi - I'm new to routing (and woodworking in general). However, that doesn't hold me back from thinking about making my own router table...

Is it possible to mount a router using skis?

I like the idea of a flat top with as few adulterations as possible. So, mounting the router directly to the top, without using a base plate, appeals to me. However, of course, for a rather thick top the range of depth adjustments available would be severely reduced. To solve that issue, one can make the area where the router is mounted thin. However, that weakens the top and possibly leads to sagging.

To alleviate the sagging issue, I was thinking of using skis to mount the router to some sort of support structure. Thus, a thinner portion of the top can be used to mount the router, because the router never really pulls on the top.

Is that a viable idea? I assume it's not really viable, because I have so far not seen a design such as this...

Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks! MM
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-08-2009, 05:41 PM
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Hi MM, Welcome to the Forum
I'm new enough myself not to feel qualified to comment on your idea but don't let that stop you from getting creative. Be sort of a statonary ski??
Some guys here have experimented (and more) with "overhead" routing, mounting routers to radial saw arms.
Good Luck

John Schaben

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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-08-2009, 06:15 PM
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IMHO not viable.
the ski's ( or support struts ) added would negate the purpose of thinning the material in the 1st place. You could do the opposite and use a thinner top with beam supports running across the under side of the table and frame in the router, but it would probably still vibrate and sag over time due to the constant vibration of the router at work.

IMO your best bet is just to use a router plate and a proper thickness table.
That way you can remove the plate with router installed and all instead of having to flip the table over every time you change bits. As well, you could use throat plates for different size and shape bits where as with just a hole and a bit through it your pretty much suck.
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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-08-2009, 11:17 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies so far.

Perhaps I wasn't too clear with my description. I intended to have the skis below the table top, mounted to the cabinet frame that also supports the top. The router base would still be screwed to the underside of the top, but it wouldn't really hang off of it. It would mostly be propped up by the frame.

MM
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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-09-2009, 12:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xvimbi View Post
Thanks for the replies so far.

Perhaps I wasn't too clear with my description. I intended to have the skis below the table top, mounted to the cabinet frame that also supports the top. The router base would still be screwed to the underside of the top, but it wouldn't really hang off of it. It would mostly be propped up by the frame.

MM
Welcome, Mischa! I really don't understand your aversion to using a mounting plate. I can't see where mounting the router direct to the top would afford any benefits that the plate doesn't meet and exceed. The plates are mounted perfectly level to the top, so I guess I truly don't understand your problem with it.

George
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-09-2009, 07:22 AM
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Hi Mischa:

The idea that I am using for my router table that I am currently building is somewhat along the line you are suggesting. I have a Bosch 1617EVSPK router kit. The motor unit is tall enough that one can make a router lift to fasten to the bottom of a thick top. On my presently-being-built table, the only penetration of the top will be a 3-1/2-inch-diameter hole that permits the router to be lifted up far enough to allow bit changes above table.

I am hoping to finish my table in the next month or two and will post details when it is done.

Cassandra

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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-09-2009, 08:14 PM
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Hi Mischa:

Found a sample lift that you might want to look at.

Router lift

Video: Router table and fence

(By the way, I have grave concerns with the techniques used in the videos.)

Cassandra

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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-10-2009, 03:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xvimbi View Post
Hi - I'm new to routing (and woodworking in general). However, that doesn't hold me back from thinking about making my own router table...

Is it possible to mount a router using skis?

I like the idea of a flat top with as few adulterations as possible. So, mounting the router directly to the top, without using a base plate, appeals to me. However, of course, for a rather thick top the range of depth adjustments available would be severely reduced. To solve that issue, one can make the area where the router is mounted thin. However, that weakens the top and possibly leads to sagging.

To alleviate the sagging issue, I was thinking of using skis to mount the router to some sort of support structure. Thus, a thinner portion of the top can be used to mount the router, because the router never really pulls on the top.

Is that a viable idea? I assume it's not really viable, because I have so far not seen a design such as this...

Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks! MM
Hi, Mischa...

I would like to discourage you from using an upside-down ski approach for mounting your router in a table. It sounds like an attractive approach but it has one falicy. To ensure the bit is 90 degrees to the wood, the two rods must be at the same level. When using skiis, this is easily done by placing something thin between the surface to be routed and the router base plate before tightening the nuts. Gravity works with you here.

If you invert this, gravity isn't your friend. You must still get the rods parallel and level except you would have to hold up the router as you tightened the nuts. I think inaccuracies would frustrate you; they would me!

You've said you want "few adulterations" so instead I'd like to encourage you to use a base plate. The base plate is made of thin, strong plastic or aluminum (so you don't lose depth) yet you can have a nice thick top for rigidity.

Gluing up and cutting a router table top is a lot simpler and more straightforward than it sounds. It was my first router project here (a few months ago) and after reading the posts on how to cut for the plate and asking a question or two I was *amazed* at how straightforward it is.

It makes a great first project and it'll make your later projects easier too!

Check out that new high-tech cordless router.. wireless and no recharging required!!
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-10-2009, 07:05 AM
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The idea will work but my advice is "Don't bother".

My Mark 1 table was basically a 3/4" sheet of ply and the router was attached using 3 clamps made from 20mm box section. The router base nestled in a routed out "nest" so that the thickness of the table above the router was about 10mm.

Mark 2 uses a recycled plastic 8mm chopping board as a plate. Sag is undetectable and bit changes are a lot easier.
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-10-2009, 08:28 AM
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Hi Mischa:

I agree with Jim. The expense and effort you would go to with under mounting a router on skis would be better spent on an OakPark baseplate.

Allthunbs
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