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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 12:03 PM Thread Starter
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Default Plate Placement

I'm going to build my first table top. I'm thinking that once built I'll have a better idea about what I want/need. What is a good placement? The OP placement appears to be centered to the front. Most of the pre-built tables have the placement centered offset to the front.

Perhaps, it doesn't matter all that much but I'd rather give myself a fighting chance, so to speak.

Thanks,
Burt
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 01:35 PM
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Hi Burt

I would suggest in the center of the top and about 8" to 10" off from the front edge (to the center of the router bit) you can flip your fence around and you will have a bigger foot print for the wider stock..(doing panels, etc.) many forget the router can be used from both sides of the router table, but if you put it to one side that's out . the norm..the OP table is setup well just for that type of job but I don't recall seeing anyone use it that way, but it is a bit narrow, this is one of the times bigger is better, many times you will want to mill long stock, so to say you need to think it out all the way..a good way is to cut some plywood out (2' x 3') and draw a cir. on some scrap plywood for a fake router bit. and play with it in your head.


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Originally Posted by Zurt View Post
I'm going to build my first table top. I'm thinking that once built I'll have a better idea about what I want/need. What is a good placement? The OP placement appears to be centered to the front. Most of the pre-built tables have the placement centered offset to the front.

Perhaps, it doesn't matter all that much but I'd rather give myself a fighting chance, so to speak.

Thanks,
Burt



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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 01:47 PM
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Hi Burt:

Welcome to the Router Forums!

I agree with Mr. Jigs (Bob) on the placement. Center the bit center between the left and right ends of the table, plus place the bit center towards the front of the table top. Eight to ten inches from the front is a typical range.

Another issue to consider is whether you will be putting in a miter track. If yes, then set the bit center back a little -- towards ten inches.

On my table top, I had more real estate to play with, the top being 24 x 48 inches. Also, my table top does not have a miter track. I placed the bit center 24 inches from the ends and 8 inches from the front edge. This means the bit center is 16 inches from the back edge. So, my table provides three bit-to-edge settings: 8, 16, and 24 inches. (The 24 inch setting isn't used much -- not much infeed or outfeed support.)

Cassandra

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Last edited by Cassandra; 11-13-2010 at 01:49 PM.
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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I notice that virtually all of the pre-assembled router tables include at least a front miter slot. Is there any advantage to having one?
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 04:22 PM
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Hi Burt

Yes and No,, it's nice place for any feather boards but if you put in one select the dual track type( one wide and one narrow) put it right on the front edge of the table top.. See below, that way you can also use just about any sled..if you want to..

plus take a look at the link below
http://www.routerforums.com/project-...th-worlds.html

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Originally Posted by Zurt View Post
I notice that virtually all of the pre-assembled router tables include at least a front miter slot. Is there any advantage to having one?


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Last edited by bobj3; 11-13-2010 at 04:33 PM.
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 05:36 PM
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Default styles of working differ

I seldom use the table for cuts that put part of the work piece behind the bit by any great amount, so I opted for more table surface at the front. My split is probably about 3/5 in front of the bit center, and 2/5 behind - leaving enough room for the plate/lift to clear the fence when it's push all the way back.

Some fences (the Incra, for example), however, require more "real estate" behind the bit center, so take that into consideration, as well when you design your table.

I used a dual miter/t-track strip in mine, placing it close enough to the bit center for my feather boards to be in range of the fence/work piece zone. Most of the TS-oriented functions of the miter slot, however, can be accomplished with a sled or push block running against the fence. Remember, "square" doesn't matter when working against a router bit.

- Ralph

Last edited by Ralph Barker; 11-13-2010 at 05:39 PM.
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zurt View Post
I notice that virtually all of the pre-assembled router tables include at least a front miter slot. Is there any advantage to having one?
Hi Burt:

It's a personal choice. Some people prefer them; some don't.

One can easily accomplish the same cuts without the miter slot or the t-track or the combo track.

Moving in a straight line can be done with a miter gauge in the miter slot. It can also be done by a sled running along the table edge.

Clamping can be done with a t-track. For example, one can clamp a featherboard to the t-track. Clamping can also be done directly onto the table top, without the need for a t-track.

The miter track and the t-track are just conveniences, not necessities.

Similarly, putting a hole in the table top to mount a starter pin is a convenience, not a necessity. A starter "pin" doesn't have to be a pin at all. A piece of lumber clamped to the table top, with a corner in the right position to act as a starter "pin", will do just as well.

Also, does one put in t-tracks to mount the fence? Again, they're conveniences, not necessities. Fences can be clamped to the table top.

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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 07:27 PM
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Hi Ralph

I must make a note,, the Incra will not take much room on the router table as long as you don't go nuts and get the over price gold one,,see below.

Most sleds/miter don't work well with the router table and the fence must run true to the track, so to say you must set both ends of the fence to get the sled/miter to do it's job..



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Originally Posted by Ralph Barker View Post
I seldom use the table for cuts that put part of the work piece behind the bit by any great amount, so I opted for more table surface at the front. My split is probably about 3/5 in front of the bit center, and 2/5 behind - leaving enough room for the plate/lift to clear the fence when it's push all the way back.

Some fences (the Incra, for example), however, require more "real estate" behind the bit center, so take that into consideration, as well when you design your table.

I used a dual miter/t-track strip in mine, placing it close enough to the bit center for my feather boards to be in range of the fence/work piece zone. Most of the TS-oriented functions of the miter slot, however, can be accomplished with a sled or push block running against the fence. Remember, "square" doesn't matter when working against a router bit.


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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 10:54 PM
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Most sleds/miter don't work well with the router table and the fence must run true to the track, so to say you must set both ends of the fence to get the sled/miter to do it's job..
========
Hi Mr. Jigs:

I have problems with your statement.

Why would one use a miter with a fence? Just as with a table saw, one should not use a miter with a fence. That's begging for a mishap.

Same can be said with a sled that references either the miter track or the table edge. In either case, the fence isn't needed.

If one wants to use a zero clearance fence with a sled, then one would use a fence-referenced sled, not a table-edge-referenced sled. With a fence-referenced sled, one would not need to worry about squaring the fence to the table's edge.

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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-13-2010, 10:58 PM
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Personally, I believe that a miter belongs on a saw (table or band), not a router table or drill press.

For the router table or drill press, one is better using a fence.

Cassandra

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