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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 08:45 AM Thread Starter
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Default What Did I Do Wrong

I seldom use a router to cut a dado. This day I needed to cut three parallel dadoes 1/4" deep and 5/8" wide. I had a 1/2" dado bit set in the router table.

After cutting the three dadoes about 1/8" deep, I raised the bit to final depth and re-cut the three dadoes successfully.

All I need to do at this point is widen each of the dadoes 1/8" and I decided that 1/4" deep would be okay. Now to re-cut the dadoes to final width and depth.

I moved the fence, did a very shallow cut to check location - it looks like a go.

At that point something went wrong. I started to feed the board into the router only to have it taken from me the thrown across the shop. No injuries except to ego and the damaged board.

I then decided to finish the project with a dado blade in the table saw but I want to know what I did wrong to have the board ripped from my grasp and slung as it was across the room. This could have become a serious accident.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 09:05 AM
gav
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Sounds like you were widening the wrong edge of the existing dado, so due to the bit rotation, it threw the board away from the fence.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 09:19 AM
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Hi

Gavin is right on when you trap the bit you are asking for it, moving the fence the wrong way you are asking for it ,asking the bit to do a climb cut you must take great care.
The best way is to use the right bit from the get go (5/8" in one pass )plywood bit

http://cgi.ebay.com/4-pc-1-2-SH-Dado...item20b600f379
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Last edited by bobj3; 12-20-2010 at 09:36 AM.
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustywoodworker View Post
I seldom use a router to cut a dado. This day I needed to cut three parallel dadoes 1/4" deep and 5/8" wide. I had a 1/2" dado bit set in the router table.

After cutting the three dadoes about 1/8" deep, I raised the bit to final depth and re-cut the three dadoes successfully.

All I need to do at this point is widen each of the dadoes 1/8" and I decided that 1/4" deep would be okay. Now to re-cut the dadoes to final width and depth.

I moved the fence, did a very shallow cut to check location - it looks like a go.

At that point something went wrong. I started to feed the board into the router only to have it taken from me the thrown across the shop. No injuries except to ego and the damaged board.

I then decided to finish the project with a dado blade in the table saw but I want to know what I did wrong to have the board ripped from my grasp and slung as it was across the room. This could have become a serious accident.

Others are right on,been there, done that If you need to widen slightly, set up so the bit is cutting the edge AWAY from the fence. If you try cutting the edge closest to the fence you will trap the stock. Think about the way the bit rotates and where the stock is going to be and it will become clear. Glad you didn't get hurt anyway.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 10:13 AM
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Good post, will help folks wit less experience.

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 11:41 AM
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I've read this post, and I don't understand the answers to the question. I know that I'm a novice when it comes to routing, etc., but why does it matter which way the fence is moved for the second cut? It seems to me that, as long as I'm feeding the stock through the table in the correct direction (right to left), it shouldn't matter which way the fence is moved.

For example, suppose I cut a 1/2 inch wide dado in the exact center of a board, then I want to widen it by 1/8 inch, and I don't care that the resulting dado won't be exactly centered anymore. If I move the fence 1/8 inch in either direction and feed the stock from right to left again, won't it be for all practical purposes as if I'm cutting a dado for the first time? The router bit and table should act exactly the same as if I'd never cut the first dado, but was simply now cutting a 1/8 inch wide dado for the first time.

I don't understand why there would be a problem no matter where the fence was, as long as I fed the stock from the correct direction.

Thanks,
Louis
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by LBrandt View Post
I've read this post, and I don't understand the answers to the question. I know that I'm a novice when it comes to routing, etc., but why does it matter which way the fence is moved for the second cut? It seems to me that, as long as I'm feeding the stock through the table in the correct direction (right to left), it shouldn't matter which way the fence is moved.

For example, suppose I cut a 1/2 inch wide dado in the exact center of a board, then I want to widen it by 1/8 inch, and I don't care that the resulting dado won't be exactly centered anymore. If I move the fence 1/8 inch in either direction and feed the stock from right to left again, won't it be for all practical purposes as if I'm cutting a dado for the first time? The router bit and table should act exactly the same as if I'd never cut the first dado, but was simply now cutting a 1/8 inch wide dado for the first time.

I don't understand why there would be a problem no matter where the fence was, as long as I fed the stock from the correct direction.

Thanks,
Louis
Hi Louis, The problem that arises is if you move the fence closer to the bit and feed right to left you ARE feeding the wrong direction. Think about the way the bit is rotating and what your dado looks like. The surface being machined will be fed in the direction of bit rotation so the bit will try to see how far it can throw the material. Moving the fence away from the bit will put the surface being machined against the bit rotation and in a controllable position. Believe me, I did it a couple of times before I figured it out. Course, I tend to be a slow learner sometimes.
Hope this helps

John Schaben

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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 12:45 PM
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Hi

John is right ON. that's why they call it a climb cut, the bit wants to climb on the stock b/4 it has a chance to remove it. climb cut are fine but must be done very slow and not remove too much stock at one time, it takes time to learn and when to use the climb cut.For most it's NO NO ,you must take care when doing them unless you like seeing wood get shot off the end of your router table and get stuck in the wall..keep a 1st.aid kit on hand if you still want to keep on doing it that way..

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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 02:01 PM Thread Starter
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John, Could I have avoided this by feeding from left to right rather than from right to left.

I went out to the shop and reset the fence after moving it the other direction and all worked well, as you said it would. But are there two ways to do this right or is there only that one I have just been taught.

Bj, I understand your comment about using the right bit rather than two cuts. I didn't have it and didn't foresee the potential of what I did. Once I turned the router on I had very little time to rethink what I was doing.

The next time - well, maybe I'll move across the shop to the TS.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 12-20-2010, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by dustywoodworker View Post
John, Could I have avoided this by feeding from left to right rather than from right to left.

I went out to the shop and reset the fence after moving it the other direction and all worked well, as you said it would. But are there two ways to do this right or is there only that one I have just been taught.

Bj, I understand your comment about using the right bit rather than two cuts. I didn't have it and didn't foresee the potential of what I did. Once I turned the router on I had very little time to rethink what I was doing.

The next time - well, maybe I'll move across the shop to the TS.
Hi Dusty - theoretically you could probably have fed the other direction. Problem is you are still trapping the stock and would be standing right where the thing wants to throw the wood so is still not a safe situation. Besides, given your relative inexperience contributed to the problem. Like I said, did it several times myself. Using the right bit is the best idea but a lot of times, what with plywood sizes being the crap shoot they are, you will likely run into this need in the future so this is good information to have.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.

Last edited by jschaben; 12-20-2010 at 03:42 PM.
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