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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-11-2011, 12:02 PM Thread Starter
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Question Newbie table/fence question

Hi All,

I'm a newbie and have been doing a lot of reading on router tables. One in particular caught my eye for a very specific reason. It's the Kreg PRS1040 system and it caught my eye due to the way the fence is on a rail system of sorts on one side of the table. They state the improvement here is the ability to get the fence perpendicular to the bit. Other tables just seem to have two slots in the table where the fence slides back and forth and as a result can easily be less perpendicular to the bit.

So I guess my question is this (remember, I'm a newbie): Since the bit is round, what the hell difference does it make if the fence is "perpendicular" to the bit?


Thanks in advance!

Sincerely, DS
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-11-2011, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by ds53652 View Post
Hi All,

I'm a newbie and have been doing a lot of reading on router tables. One in particular caught my eye for a very specific reason. It's the Kreg PRS1040 system and it caught my eye due to the way the fence is on a rail system of sorts on one side of the table. They state the improvement here is the ability to get the fence perpendicular to the bit. Other tables just seem to have two slots in the table where the fence slides back and forth and as a result can easily be less perpendicular to the bit.

So I guess my question is this (remember, I'm a newbie): Since the bit is round, what the hell difference does it make if the fence is "perpendicular" to the bit?


Thanks in advance!

Sincerely, DS
I believe what is ment is that:
"the fence and the axis of rotation of the bit need to perpendiculer to the table top".

Ray H
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-11-2011, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ds53652 View Post
Hi All,

I'm a newbie and have been doing a lot of reading on router tables. One in particular caught my eye for a very specific reason. It's the Kreg PRS1040 system and it caught my eye due to the way the fence is on a rail system of sorts on one side of the table. They state the improvement here is the ability to get the fence perpendicular to the bit. Other tables just seem to have two slots in the table where the fence slides back and forth and as a result can easily be less perpendicular to the bit.

So I guess my question is this (remember, I'm a newbie): Since the bit is round, what the hell difference does it make if the fence is "perpendicular" to the bit?


Thanks in advance!

Sincerely, DS

Hi DS - Welcome to the forum

I don't know where you got your information but here is a quote from the Kreg website concerning the fence:

"Innovative Fence
Taking design cues from high-end table saw rip fences, the Precision Router Table Fence features a t-square style design which keeps the fence permanently parallel to the miter slot. This automatic squaring lets you fully utilize your miter slot and makes it easier than ever to make small adjustments on the fly. The fence is made from an incredibly rigid fully-enclosed aluminum extrusion which helps support even the largest workpieces, while also helping to create a full length vacuum chamber for superior dust collection and a cleaner shop. The fence also includes two fully independent fence faces, allowing the router table to double as a vertical jointer."



While this may be a nice feature, I personally don't think it necessary nor even particularly desirable in all situations. JMHO

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-11-2011, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ds53652 View Post
Hi All,



So I guess my question is this (remember, I'm a newbie): Since the bit is round, what the hell difference does it make if the fence is "perpendicular" to the bit?


Thanks in advance!

Sincerely, DS
Once in a while you will need to rout the end of a board such as cabinet door rails where they meet the door stiles. A mitre fence makes that a lot easier. It can be one that rides in the table slot or you can make a right angle sled that slides against the main fence. If you use a sled, the main fence does not need to be parallel to the table.
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-06-2015, 07:12 AM
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A fancy fence is not important for 99.9 percent of the time. When it comes into play is when you have to make very precise cuts like the fancy joining that you can do with the Incra. In most cases a simple board clamped to the table with a space for the router bit to clear will work. Most of the bits will have a bearing on them and this is what the wood rides on so the fence just makes it easier to get a clean cut. The other thing a fence is useful for is holding feather boards and giving you a place to hook up dust collection. As you can see with mine I have made it adjustable (back and forth) by about 5 inches. To adjust it simply loosen the bolts and slide it back or forward. Another thing is that the front two parts of the fence can be removed and turned upside down. What that does is place the T tracks at a different height which lets me get the most distance out of the feather boards. The adjustment built into the feather boards doesn't allow for a large variation. Feather boards are a must to hold your wood tight to the table, especially when doing long thin boards such as moldings. Feather boards are also nice on the table to hold the wood tight to the fence.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-06-2015, 07:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ds53652 View Post
Hi All,

I'm a newbie and have been doing a lot of reading on router tables. One in particular caught my eye for a very specific reason. It's the Kreg PRS1040 system and it caught my eye due to the way the fence is on a rail system of sorts on one side of the table. They state the improvement here is the ability to get the fence perpendicular to the bit. Other tables just seem to have two slots in the table where the fence slides back and forth and as a result can easily be less perpendicular to the bit.

So I guess my question is this (remember, I'm a newbie): Since the bit is round, what the hell difference does it make if the fence is "perpendicular" to the bit?


Thanks in advance!

Sincerely, DS
the bit is round...
perpendicular to the bit is an arbitrarily state of being...
now perpendicular to the miter gage is another whole deal/ball of wax...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 04-06-2015 at 07:36 AM.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-06-2015, 08:23 AM
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Hi DS. Welcome to our little corner of the 'net.

As Bob Rosenthal(Router Workshop series) always said "the bit is round, and it doesn't matter what direction you approach it, it will cut"

I use a simple, home-made fence that I fasten to the table with c-clamps. The "fancy" store bought ones are nice, but I've not seen the need to purchase one. I don't use a mitre slot either, just use a sled or push block that rides along the fence.

The above is "MY" choice, and certainly not the only way. I've looked at different commercial fences, and while they look nice, I'm cheap (ask my wife, she'll tell you) and don't want to spend the money on them.

Brian


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or by imbeciles who really mean it.

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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-06-2015, 08:36 AM
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I use an Incra LS Positioner so I'm committed to a fence. However, unless you are using micropositioning to cut things like dovetails and box joints, a fence doesn't need to be very much at all. As a beginner, I recommend you start out with something very simple, maybe even just a board with a space for the bit hogged out and clamped to the table top. As you gain some experience, you'll get a better sense of what works for you. I'm a big fan of starting simple and letting my needs drive the next stage of my tools. The problem with cutting T tracks in a table top is knowing where they should be for the way you work and you won't know that until you get some miles on your router table.
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