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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 09:40 AM Thread Starter
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My Freud manual says to route the outside of a square left to right but right to left for the inside. Makes no sense but I'll accept it for the moment.

Using that logic does is apply if I'm routing on a table? Example. I have a board. One side has a factory edge. The other side is ragged. I would place the factory edge on the fence side with the bit on the ragged side. Would I go left to right or right to left? Or, does it matter at all?
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Zurt View Post
My Freud manual says to route the outside of a square left to right but right to left for the inside. Makes no sense but I'll accept it for the moment.

Using that logic does is apply if I'm routing on a table? Example. I have a board. One side has a factory edge. The other side is ragged. I would place the factory edge on the fence side with the bit on the ragged side. Would I go left to right or right to left? Or, does it matter at all?
I would recommend neither. The reason being that you are about to jam the work piece between the fence and the bit. It would be better to use a bearing bit and a straight edge to clean up the ragged end.

The reason for routing left to right (router upright) is the bit is spinning clockwise. If the router is mounted in a table the feed should be right to left.

Hope this helps.

Al

Last edited by boogalee; 01-13-2011 at 10:25 AM.
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 10:24 AM
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Zurt...

its all about 'bit rotation' and when/where the cutting edge of the bit makes contact with the material being cut.

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Zurt View Post
My Freud manual says to route the outside of a square left to right but right to left for the inside. Makes no sense but I'll accept it for the moment.

Using that logic does is apply if I'm routing on a table? Example. I have a board. One side has a factory edge. The other side is ragged. I would place the factory edge on the fence side with the bit on the ragged side. Would I go left to right or right to left? Or, does it matter at all?
This situation sound a little less than safe. You're creating a part-launching situation... Router tables are not used like table saws. The material does not go between the fence and the bit. The fence and the bit are on the same side of the material; the fence is used to guide the material past the bit, working the edge of the material.

Think of it this way: Have you ever seen a baseball pitching machine, the type that feeds a ball between a couple of rotating wheels? That's exactly what you are doing if you feed that board in from the wrong side. The router bit will catch the edge of the material and yank it through the restriction, probably bending or breaking the bit in the process, and maybe pulling your fingers in with it... Bad, bad juju.



(Please note: the previous statments are not absolute. As with most rules, there are many cases where these words do not apply. IE: creating dados, or jointing parallel edges. However, these are special-purpose operations and can require quite a bit of preperation.)
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 10:46 AM
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If the manual is not making sense, grab your router and chuck up a straight bit.
Leaving the router unplugged, simulate a routing operation on the outside of an object (a table edge, or whatever). As you're moving the router along the material (left to right, or counter-clockwise), you'll see that the bit will take tiny shavings out of the material.

Now do the same thing for an inside cut, except this time you'll be moving the router in a clockwise direction (or, as the manual says, right to left).

If none of this makes sense, I'll try to find some pictures that explain the process. I'm sure someone has posted something like this before, but I haven't been around long enough to know where they are
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 11:00 AM
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I would place the factory edge on the fence side with the bit on the ragged side.
I do this all the time but you must absolutely be aware that you will be feeding the work from the OPPOSITE side of the table that you are used to. "Backward" from your point of view, but still forward relative to the bit.

Also, be aware the bit will be fully exposed with no protection or guards so extra attention to safety and bit awareness is critical for these types of operations.

ALWAYS feed the material into the cutting edge of the bit, NEVER on the back side of the cutting edges as it will throw the material with great force. If you trap the work between the fence and the bit, the cutting edges are facing the opposite direction than you are used to with a fence.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 11:29 AM Thread Starter
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What I'm not understanding is if one side is very uneven how can I straighten is against the bit? I can't see how the bearing would help? Would it just follow the unevenness?

I'm reluctant to try this as I've had a few pieces blow up already. Let me know when it's safe to go back in the water.

Burt
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2011, 12:01 PM
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If you're using the router free-hand, you could clamp a straight edge under the piece, and set the router depth so that the bearing follows the straight edge. The straight edge will have to be something with a bit of thickness, like some aluminum box-tube, or perhaps an already straight edge of plywood or MDF.

If you've already got one straight edge, and you need the opposite edge to be parallel, that's best left to the table saw (until you've got a bit more experience with the router).

Perhaps you could post some pictures of your project along with a description of what you want to do? If we know what you're working towards or trying to make, I'm sure someone can offer better / more specific advice.
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