dust collection/cooling in enclosed table - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-10-2011, 04:54 PM Thread Starter
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Default dust collection/cooling in enclosed table

Hi all;

I'm one of those who is still trying to design a good router table--with adequate storage, an enclosed router with good dust collection capabilities, but also with adequate cooling for the enclosed router.

Seems like there are lots of different ideas out there. Most DC articles seem to stress the need for adequate air flow (and not just from the bit/ring opening). Others seem to stress the need for lots of air around the router (but not thru it).

Just curious what some of you serious router-table gurus have employed to maximize your dust collection while still keeping your router cool.

Throw your idea out this way.

Thanks,
s/Mike
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-10-2011, 05:18 PM
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Hi Mike:

Welcome to the Router Forums!

A concept that I like is "it's better to collect the dust at the source, than to sweep it up later." On the router table top, there are two primary areas to collect the dust from.

The first and most obvious is from the fence. So, one is advised to add dust collection there.

The second is under the table. But where? My humble opinion is to collect the dust from as close to the bit as possible. This avoids dust going where one really doesn't want it to go -- into the router and onto the floor. In my table, I have a dust chute that pulls air from under the rings. The router exhaust helps move air into the chute. Works well.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-10-2011, 05:30 PM
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I have one of these mounted in an old craftsman open router table. I have DC connected to the fence and to the DC port on the router and almost all cuttings are collected.


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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-10-2011, 05:37 PM
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The routers I have used in cabinets seem to run much hotter than routers run in open air. I am therefore not a big fan of cabinets. I am performance over appearance. Part of the problem with the cabinets I have used (they weren't mine) may have been that they didn't have adequate draft. If you are using a 4 " vac hose then you should have 2x2x3.14159 square inches of opening around the router for proper air flow. This isn't just for your router, it's also for your vac system. Running it without adequate flow will heat it up too. Maybe other members will have different experiences.

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-11-2011, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJM60 View Post
I have one of these mounted in an old craftsman open router table. I have DC connected to the fence and to the DC port on the router and almost all cuttings are collected.

Robert , how do like that router overall ? I just got one of them New in the box from Craigslist for $60 and havent used it very much but so far it seems to have plenty of power and the adjustment is really good as soon as you figure out thr right way to do it (manual is not to good)
I am going to be mounting it my table this weekend now that I have my plate drilled and installed in the opening.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-12-2011, 03:22 AM
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There's been at least a couple of discussions where people wondered why no router manufacturer sold a router either with (or an add-on attachment) to a router designed to draw its "fresh air" from a separate hose that could be vented out of a dust collection cabinet akin to wood stoves that draw their burning air from outside.

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-12-2011, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJimAK View Post
There's been at least a couple of discussions where people wondered why no router manufacturer sold a router either with (or an add-on attachment) to a router designed to draw its "fresh air" from a separate hose that could be vented out of a dust collection cabinet akin to wood stoves that draw their burning air from outside.
Agreed, Jim!

Some manufacturers do make it easier to add such a feature to their routers. For example, the Bosch routers I have have a circular shape, unlike the square one on the imaged router above. With a circular shape, one can easily make an adapter to slip over the intake end of the router, to adapt a piece of dust collection hose from a source of fresh air. (May need to add a fan to the other end of the hose to compensate for the air drag in the hose.)

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-14-2011, 04:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer2007 View Post
Robert , how do like that router overall ? I just got one of them New in the box from Craigslist for $60 and havent used it very much but so far it seems to have plenty of power and the adjustment is really good as soon as you figure out thr right way to do it (manual is not to good)
I am going to be mounting it my table this weekend now that I have my plate drilled and installed in the opening.
I like it okay. I paid $90 for mine including shipping (bought it on e-bay, or Craig's list). It's like new. Power is good. I don't use the digital readout much. A 1/4" collet would be nice.

Mine is mounted in a table and fitted with a Router Raizer. This model is not included in their instructions but, in general, I was able to use the craftsman instructions with some modifications and some JB Weld epoxy. Someday I'll post the pictures. The stock height adjustment is worthless (in my opinion).

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-27-2011, 12:55 AM
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I've seen lots of pics of router tables in this forum to get ideas to build a stand-alone router table (current routing is done from the home made router top attached to the left side of the table saw) and I see most of the cabinet where the router sits has 3-5 holes for air intake. How much air intake is necessary if you use 4" dust collection tube at the back of the cabinet? Also, is the placement of intake holes (top, bottom or sides even) play a vital role to the cabinet dust collection?
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-27-2011, 09:31 PM
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I use a PC890 in my table/cabinet, and have been considering cutting a 4" hole in the box under the router. A piece of flex DC hose or PVC pipe stuck in the hole would go straight up to the router, providing fresh air for it. The router fan would draw the air through.

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