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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 05:34 AM Thread Starter
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Question A no-no?

Hi

I was playing around with my RT last night and decided to use it to cut a shallow rebate in the bottom of a small box, so that the bottom (approximately 4mm thick) could sit flush in the recess. I set the RT up so that the stock (about 6mm thick, 80mm x 300mm) would pass between the bit and the fence. I used my feed direction rule (ie palm up, make a 'gun' with thumb and index finger : thumb points at fence, index finger points to feed direction) so established the feed direction. Being a RT newbie, I put two feather boards on (one vertical, one horizontal) and used a push stick The stock didn't feed smoothly at all - it almost "jumped" through in short bursts, and when I examined the cut, you could see if wasn't a nice smooth cut. I was puzzled as thought I had done it properly - although I possibly removed too much material at once. Anyway, here's what I did - could someone please give me some feedback?

First attempt:depicted in Diagram A
Looking at it now, it seems that I was feeding with the bit rotation - which is wrong (correct?) - but why did it jump through, and not shoot away? Maybe because the stock was being squeezed between bit and fence - or maybe the feather board slowed things?

Second attempt : depicted in Diagram B
Again, looking at it now - this appears the right feed direction - but this produced a worse cut than Diagram A's setup - in fact the stock took off (albeit slowly) and heading off away from the fence, chewing though the lower edge of the box's side.

Were both of these attempts incorrect?? Should I not be placing the stock between the fence and the bit??


So I made two more diagrams (C & D) - I haven't tried these yet. If I indeed shouldn't have been placing the stock between the fence and the bit, then Diagram C looks like the one I should use - correct?

Matthew
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Attached Files
File Type: pdf RT birdseye_between.pdf (16.5 KB, 177 views)
File Type: pdf RT birdseye_outside.pdf (16.1 KB, 142 views)
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 06:37 AM
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Hi Matthew:

A: bad
B: bad
C: proper
D: risky

General rule: Do not trap workpiece between bit and fence. That's asking for trouble! More like begging, than asking.

D is a climb cut. Generally a bad idea, but sometimes used. If used, make minimal cut (depth and width.)

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Last edited by Cassandra; 04-12-2011 at 06:42 AM.
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 06:51 AM
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I can't improve on what Cassandra has said other than to admonish you my friend, I really thought that you were by this time fully familiar with the basics of routing.

Harry



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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 07:21 AM Thread Starter
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Ah - I knew it! At the time it seemed the right thing to do (to be fair to myself, I've only used the RT a handful of times, and don't recall reading anywhere that feeding between the fence and the bit was a BAD idea) however when the cuts came out poorly and jumpy, I stopped work.

I must have had all my safety gear working well in order to survive those blunders without loosing a digit!!

I'll give it a try when I next get time...this time using method C!!

Thanks for your advice.
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 10:30 AM
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For doing what you describe, I've found the best way to do it is with a handheld router.
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 10:44 AM
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HI

I will 2nd this post but add ALWAYS use a push block, that will let you hold the stock down and push it forward...big or small stock..push block it..


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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassandra View Post
Hi Matthew:

A: bad
B: bad
C: proper
D: risky

General rule: Do not trap workpiece between bit and fence. That's asking for trouble! More like begging, than asking.

D is a climb cut. Generally a bad idea, but sometimes used. If used, make minimal cut (depth and width.)

Cassandra



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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassandra View Post
Hi Matthew:

A: bad
B: bad
C: proper
D: risky

General rule: Do not trap workpiece between bit and fence. That's asking for trouble! More like begging, than asking.

D is a climb cut. Generally a bad idea, but sometimes used. If used, make minimal cut (depth and width.)

Cassandra
Hi Matthew,
Glad you didn't get hurt. I agree with Cassandra also.

James
Whittier, CA.

Have a nice & safe day!
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 12:06 PM
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Hi Matt - I can't really add anything to what has been said. You correctly deduced that method C is the best. I would like to note that sometimes you can trap stock when it's not all that obvious you are going to do so. For example, If you want to make a dado a bit wider, you need to adjust the fence back so the bit would be taking off the edge closest to the front of the table. If just taking of a few thousands, it always felt natural to move the fence toward me until the first time I tried it and the thing ripped the stock out of my hand and did it's level best to put a hole in the far wall. Good luck

John Schaben

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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 08:20 PM
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"C" is correct as the stock moves against the bit direction and the stock is not between the bit and fence.
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 04-12-2011, 08:27 PM
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Default Had not thought of it but glad you mentioned it

Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
............. I would like to note that sometimes you can trap stock when it's not all that obvious you are going to do so. For example, If you want to make a dado a bit wider, you need to adjust the fence back so the bit would be taking off the edge closest to the front of the table. If just taking of a few thousands, it always felt natural to move the fence toward me until the first time I tried it and the thing ripped the stock out of my hand and did it's level best to put a hole in the far wall. Good luck
Thanks for bringing that up..... hopefully I will remember that before I try to widen a dado or at worst before I hurt myself!!!

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