vertical table equals horizontal router - Router Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-05-2011, 11:24 PM Thread Starter
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Default vertical table equals horizontal router

There were two motivations that inspired the attached router fence. I keep tool catalouges in the privy's mag rack and had drooled over the horizontal router and I had been perplexed turning out consistent lock mitre joints.

I have a Bosch router table on a roll away cart. Their fence is a strange proprietary design. I rigged a sliding bar on the track so I had something to clamp the vertical lock mitre cut. Bosch pictures show hdpe dado'd into mdf boards. the hdpe rides in the slot of the t-trac on the router fence. The trick was getting the slider face in line with fence face but it worked and it turned out consistent lockmitre on 3/8 ths stock. thats close to 10MM for you non-imperialists.

Then after purchasing Wood Magazines Shop Jigs and Fixtures and seeing the Plunge Jig for a fence and a sliding table I decided to build my own.

The fence is doubled 3/4" sanded plywood. I find gluing plywood with bellys bumping usually provides a very stiff and straight board. The bit cavity is 5" high to accomdate collette extension to mill wide moldings. The fence face is split horizontally. There are 3" and 2" wide faces. Also the high fence required 5" lift blocks to tighten fence on T trac.

The fence faces are 5/8ths MDF. An offset fence is achieved by milling 3/4" MDF down to 21/32 and 11/16 thick for the outfeed.

The vertical table was made large enough to accomadate attaching a plunge jig and wide boards

The sliding table rides on HDPE runners on the top of fence. The HDPE guides are Dado'd into the MDF sides and slide in the 1/4" slot in the router fence.

The table was assembled in place. The table sides and core were clamped together on the fence. With everything aligned thru bolts were drilled and installed. Some sanding was required after assembly in order to achieve smooth sliding. A file running along fence slot worked great.

If I ever build the plunge table I will post later
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-11-2011, 02:54 PM
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Bill, the table fence is an interesting design but it is not a vertical router table. A vertical router table has the router mounted horizontaly.

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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 02:25 AM
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I think there is a little confusion of terminology here Mike. My Horizontal router table has the router mounted horizontally. My standard router table has the router mounted vertically. Hence when describing either we are describing how the router is mounted. Hence a standard router table despite the type of fence could be described as a vertical router table because that is the way the router is mounted. Ditto for the horizontal router table hence not as you described same.

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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 09:31 AM
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Lee, the standard router table is a horizontal table with the router mounted vertically. A vertical table has the router mounted horizontally. I know this seems backwards in the description. The table is the reference described.

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Last edited by Mike; 06-12-2011 at 09:35 AM.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 09:39 AM Thread Starter
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Irregardless of the terminology There is a wide sliding mechanism that runs vertical stock accurately, which is the appeal of adding a horizontal router to the shop. It worked well running lock mitre on 1X8 oak stock And I referred to my fence as a vertical table and it functions as well as what the catalougs call a horizxontal router. So what nomenclature did I misuse?
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 10:19 AM Thread Starter
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To be clear a horizontal ROUTER works on a horizontal table and a vertical ROUTER works on a horizontal table, The SLIDING TABLE is oriented vertically. Mike commented on router orientation. The thread title address table orientation.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 11:15 AM
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You guys can name it anything you want, I like it
Anything to help run a lock miter is a good thing.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 04:41 PM
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Ok, I know this seems like I am being bull headed but English is a very specific language. In photo 1 you see a router table. The table is horizontal, correct? No mention of the router itself, just the router table. Photo 2 is a horizontal panel raising bit. No mention of the router or it's position: this bit is to be used so the cutting action is horizontal. So far, so good. The problem arises when a router is mounted horizontally in a vertical router table. If we leave the router out of this and look at the router table it is vertical. Remember that the router is mounted in the router table. The fence is what guides our work on the router table and is 90º(most of the time) to the table surface. On a standard router table the fence is vertical; on a vertical router table it is horizontal. Since a router table is a router table with out the router installed the reference should be the orientation of the table itself, not the position of the router. When vertical router tables were introduced they were incorrectly named for the position of the router when the table itself is vertical. See my point? It would be correct to call them "horizontally mounted router" tables but the router table itself is still vertical. Please give this some thought and see if it makes sense to you. Industry standards are created by a consensus; I am willing to contact any manufacturers and present this information and hopefully get them to agree and change the way they advertise their product. You are of course welcome to tell me I am full of beans but as I stated earlier; English is a very specific language.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 06:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Ok, I know this seems like I am being bull headed but English is a very specific language.
Yeah, what he said. Seriously though, the pictures tell the story, I admit I expected to see the router mounted sideways, (is it ok if I say that?), but I figured it out fairly quickly. And I always like to see new solutions, they sometimes inspire me.

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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-12-2011, 11:06 PM
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Mike: I'm just as bullheaded & to prove it one of the earliest router experts to add a horizontal router to his standard table was the late Patrick Spielman....he called it a horizontal router table. Another very experienced router man is Bill Hilton who designed several of what he called a horizontal router tables. In each case the router is mounted horizontally & both very experienced authors use the same terminology. In simple terminology horizontal routers mount to what is basically a fence & the bit projects horizontally into the table on which the work piece slides. With a straight bit the horizontal router table safely handles jointer work on smaller pieces than you would attempt with a regular jointer.In any case, I think I will stick with the terminology used by such experts.

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