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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 01:49 AM Thread Starter
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I have seen and read many threads on making your own table for a router but I have some concerns on doing this. I can make a table/bench for a router no problem but my real concern is with the table top itself. The table top seems pretty straightforward to build but regarding accuracy and the likes I wonder how difficult it would be to build one?
I am concerned about the fence slots being perfectly parallel (or is that even that important) and how to go about doing so (edgeguide, improvised guide and clamps etc?)

Another concern is a miter slot because I see myself looking to use my new bosch 1617 router combo as much as possible for making trim, dado's and much more. How the heck do you get create a accurate miter without a table.

Maybe I am just concerned most about accuracy and things like my cuts not being the best or even my MDF, plywood or whatever not being square. Basically I am looking to up my game from installing premade stuff to making as many things I can on my own and how I want them instead of being a slave to the box stores.

I have a old (from the 80's) direct drive table saw I was given that cuts pretty straight
a 10" sliding compound miter
and of course drills, sanders, circ saw and a couple finish nail guns

I know that is a lot to digest so any input is welcome!
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 02:56 AM
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If I ever do get around to building a table up, I will use the top off of my Wolfcraft table. The basic steel frame does a great job of holding the top up, but nothing more. It would be more space efficient to have it on top of a nice cabinet with storage drawers etc, but that is something for the future.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 11:14 AM
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If there is one piece of advice that is worth listening to it is "Keep it simple." You do not need fence or miter slots in your router table. When you use a miter slot it requires that your fence be parallel to the slot to prevent binding that can ruin your work piece. Why fool with this when you can use a push block guided by your fence and eliminate that problem and additional set up time? Using fence slots means fooling with the through bolts when you add or remove your fence. Your goal is to successfully create projects as easily as possible, right? The Router Workshop methods are time proven to be effective and easy. Read the sticky threads to get started.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 12:37 PM
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As a beginning woodworker a router table was my very first project. I built it based loosely on a picture I saw in a magazine. I only built the cabinet, the top and fence I bought. I built it so the table can be lifted and propped open for easy access to the router for cleaning or whatever. As you can see the router is enclosed to lessen the noise and dust.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the insight mike as the simple approach probably would serve me best until i expand mjy skillset and want more. for my current needs i guess a miter is not needed i did read a post of yours today regarding a simple table and i think that would serve me well. Any other input is still appreciated gents
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 04:20 PM
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It may surprise you to learn that the more your skills advance the less you need the fancy "Whistles and bells" options. I use a 1617 in a Router Workshop table, I have another 1617 in the plunge base. They have served me trouble free for over 11 years now. Add a set of brass set up bars and a set of brass guide bushings and you will be amazed how many projects you can complete. I highly recommend the Oak Park box joint jigs. I suggest you order at least the 3/8" jig before they are gone since there will be no more.

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Bee View Post
As a beginning woodworker a router table was my very first project. I built it based loosely on a picture I saw in a magazine. I only built the cabinet, the top and fence I bought. I built it so the table can be lifted and propped open for easy access to the router for cleaning or whatever. As you can see the router is enclosed to lessen the noise and dust.
Dang it Ken, I was just trying to draw something up for my router table and forgot all about your hinged top. When I first saw it a while back, I thought this is what I'm going to do too. Now I got to make some changes in my design.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-29-2012, 10:49 PM
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My own two cents is to first ensure what you're making, and what you're using, is safe. Much like driving a car, there are a hundred things to look at on the dashboard, and there are only two or three which you really need to know: get it in-gear, press the accelerator, aim the car with the steering wheel, how to stop. Start with the basics, as your skills and professionalism drive you, they will lead to specific upgrades - on tables, routers, fences, and accessories - but get the basics: a flat table with a hole, a router, and sturdy mount, and something straight to guide your work through the bit. Certainly there is much more to woodworking than this, but you have to start the journey, and find you're own version of its where it leads.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2012, 01:19 AM
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You don’t need a miter slot in your table. Everything should be referenced off of your fence. That is what sets your depth of cut and should be your guide. If you use a miter slot as the guide, then every time you change the depth you must change the mount of your jig in the miter slot, plus the miter slot then must remain parallel to the fence. For feather boards, use a board with the feather attached to it, then there is no problem with your work being too wide to go between the feather and the fence – plus you can use the feather board for other things. Here is a quote from Woodpeck XXX about their sled and miter track.
“Another important feature is the clear guide. The primary purpose of the guide is to allow the sled to track along the fence rather than the miter slot.
This approach is faster and easier to setup and eliminates the need to align your router fence perfectly parallel to the miter slot. It also eliminates the need for having a miter slot in your router table.”
To get the fence mount slots parallel –rip a piece of ply parallel i.e. like14” ( as needed to fit size) and sq’d ends then use that as your guide left and right while against the back of your fence ( set forward and sq.) as your guide for the router to cut the slots. You can use a guide bushing or the router base if it is concentric. If the router base is not concentric then use the same spot on the base for both cuts.
No idea here how you want to build a cab or frame. I like a metal ( alum. Angle 6061-T6 or iron) that is straight, bolted to the bottom of the table top extending out to within 3” of each edge on the sides. Then 2 pcs between closer to the center, but outside of any plate you may use. This provides a firm- hold it flat substrate for long term use. No bowing or warping o center sagging. Attach the under frame to the table while it’s clamped top down to your table saw top, then to the frame so you don’t warp your top to fit the cab.
I am using the 1617 also. It’s very easy to drop the router out of the housing and change the bit. No table dings etc and you brush out the router so your adjustment are more accurate and smooth. I never remove the mounting plate, as I have it set dead flush and bolted down tight.
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