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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 11:11 AM Thread Starter
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I have graciously agreed to build a Hoosier Cabinet for my wife, good of me, right? Things are actually coming along very well and I have actually been using a router table and havent screwed anything up (very much). QUESTION: the upper section doors all have a glass in the top section of the rail and stile type construction. I need to remove the back of the 1/4" wide 3/8" deep slot where a panel would have normally been inserted. When removed, the glass needs to go in and then strips cut to secure glass panels. Problem, no router bit will trim the back shoulder off......clearances all too close. What am I not seeing? If this is too simple, I will be ashamed!!!!!!
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 01:41 PM
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I take it that the doors are already glued up?
If so, you MAY be able to set the fence on the router table and, using a straight bit, remove the shoulder.
Set up a stop for the beginning and ending of the cut so you don't rout past the adjoining panel slots. At least two passes should get rid of the shoulder.
Then, change to a larger dia. straight bit (if necessary) and deepen the cut to allow for the glass and retaining strip.
If the door hasn't been glued, Just cut the shoulder away on the table saw and deepen the cut on the router table.
On the Hoosier I built, I just ran a bead of clear silicone around the inside. It's held for 10 years. The doors are 17" wide by 27 1/2" high with 3/4"X2" rails and stiles. The inset for the glass is 3/8"X3/8".

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Last edited by Gene Howe; 06-14-2012 at 01:44 PM.
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 02:03 PM
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What Gene said, plus...

I'm also not sure what you mean by the clearance being too close. Any appropriately-sized straight/rabbeting bit (w/o bearings) chucked up in the router table should take care of that pretty neatly.

Did you use a decorative rail & stile bit set for the doors or are we talking straight tenon and groove construction? If it's the former, I don't think you can go much deeper without getting into the profile. But then, it shouldn't be necessary unless your glass is very thick. Depending on the bit used to make the original profile, just routing the shoulder off should give you a rabbet ⅜" w x ~⅜" d, if your stock is " thick.

Last edited by PetersCreek; 06-14-2012 at 02:08 PM.
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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 02:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you Gene - Yes, panels, rails, stiles are all glued. I guess I thought that all bearings on flush cutters would be less than 1/4". I fotgot about the set screw on top. Tossed around setting up rails on top and using router freehand. That is not a good looking proposition. If my flush cut just had a closer bearing clearance I would be OK. I am afraid of trying to free hand it without any guides. I'm still thinking, thinking, thinking.........Annnnny advice (free of course) would be welcome.
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 02:21 PM
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You'll need to plunge each time you start a cut. Just set the work against the back stop and fence at an angle (front raised) and lower it on to the bit. Doing it this way though, I'm afraid a feather board will interfere. An out board guide is not a good idea, either.
Yeah, I thought of a flush cut bit, too. But came to the same conclusion you did.
Looks like a router table and fence is the best option....short of cutting a new set of rails and stiles.
BTW, I'll send a bill.

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Originally Posted by wude butcher View Post
Thank you Gene - Yes, panels, rails, stiles are all glued. I guess I thought that all bearings on flush cutters would be less than 1/4". I fotgot about the set screw on top. Tossed around setting up rails on top and using router freehand. That is not a good looking proposition. If my flush cut just had a closer bearing clearance I would be OK. I am afraid of trying to free hand it without any guides. I'm still thinking, thinking, thinking.........Annnnny advice (free of course) would be welcome.

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.

Last edited by Gene Howe; 06-14-2012 at 02:26 PM.
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 04:46 PM
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Rather than plunging to start the cut consider boring a starter hole full depth of the final cut with a Forstner bit the diameter of the router bit. Lower the hole onto the cutter, secure the piece and then start the router and proceed with the cut. I don't have a plunge router or a router table so I use that method portable routing with a guide fence. Sometimes I'll use a stop hole also. I can tell by the sound when the stop hole is reached and on a one time item it's quicker than setting up a stop as in production would require.

Last edited by 57759; 06-14-2012 at 04:49 PM.
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 05:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wude butcher View Post
I have graciously agreed to build a Hoosier Cabinet for my wife, good of me, right? Things are actually coming along very well and I have actually been using a router table and havent screwed anything up (very much). QUESTION: the upper section doors all have a glass in the top section of the rail and stile type construction. I need to remove the back of the 1/4" wide 3/8" deep slot where a panel would have normally been inserted. When removed, the glass needs to go in and then strips cut to secure glass panels. Problem, no router bit will trim the back shoulder off......clearances all too close. What am I not seeing? If this is too simple, I will be ashamed!!!!!!
Use a rabbetting bit.

Amazon.com: Freud 32-504 1/4-Inch Shank Multi-Rabbeting Router Bit Set: Joe Dolan: Home Improvement
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 06:30 PM
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New to all of this, so bear with me...
Would cutting a template and using guide bushings be an option? If all the glass openings are the same, only one template would need to be made. Clamp to the frame and take the stock out in a few passes. Router out of the table, door face down. If you had two routers, you could set the template, rout half the stock with router A, the rest with router B, move to the next pane.

Just thinking.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 06:49 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks ALL - I believe Al (a man of few words) has gotten me going down a simpler easier path. I may need to add another bit to my small collection. The Multi-Rabbiting bit - interesting!!!!! Thanks Sandbur, I thought of the hole, but that pesky bearing again. The rabbiting bit MAY be the answer.
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-14-2012, 07:36 PM
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I was going to suggest the rabbeting bit also. The only thing it won't do for you is square the corners. If you need them square you will need a (very) sharp chisel.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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