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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 08:09 AM Thread Starter
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Question Removeable protective table-top

Hi

This is my first post so I hope it's in the right place.

I am designing a router table to have an mdf top approx 1.5 inches thick.

I want the router table to double as a spare bench at times so I want to add an additonal removeable protective top (much like you would add a sacrifical plywood top to a work bench). This removeable top might be 1/2 inch ply.

The question is how to fasten this protective table top to the main mdf table top in a quick-release fashion and in a way that does not mar the surface of the main mdf top.

I have thought about adding hardwood edging to both table tops and fastening the two together via the edge banding; but what's the best method?

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

Hope this all makes sense otherwise I could try to add a pic or google sketch up file if possible.

Cheers

Errol
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by ezza88 View Post
Hi

This is my first post so I hope it's in the right place.

I am designing a router table to have an mdf top approx 1.5 inches thick.

I want the router table to double as a spare bench at times so I want to add an additonal removeable protective top (much like you would add a sacrifical plywood top to a work bench). This removeable top might be 1/2 inch ply.

The question is how to fasten this protective table top to the main mdf table top in a quick-release fashion and in a way that does not mar the surface of the main mdf top.

I have thought about adding hardwood edging to both table tops and fastening the two together via the edge banding; but what's the best method?

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

Hope this all makes sense otherwise I could try to add a pic or google sketch up file if possible.

Cheers

Errol
Make the edge banding 16mm (5/8") deeper on the protective top than the router top so it sits over the whole router top, fit flush bolts to under side of router top and drill holes into edge banding of protective top. all out of sight and nothing to get damaged or make edge banding flush with bottom of router top banding and fit plywood butterfly cleats.

Their just 2 simple methods that come to mind
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 08:57 AM
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Hi Errol

Why not an oversize top with an apron of 2 x 1 softwood applied all round (so it drops onto the router table and won't move about) and a couple of wooden turn buckles to stop it from being lifted?

Regards

Phil
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 09:14 AM Thread Starter
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Cheers Oziray, some nice ideas.

Do you think that I might need some downward fixing force though to keep the protective top flat though? The top will be about 4'6" by 2'4" and my workshop can get a bit damp.

I want it to be quick release so I think bolts are out but I like the cleat idea.

A, 'plywood butterfly cleat'? Do you mean like a home made cleat you turn that would prevent lifting of the protective top?

I suppose if there was a thickness difference between the different edge bands and an angle on the turning cleat it wood give me some sandwiching force to pull the two tops together. If you see what I mean?
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 09:19 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Errol

Why not an oversize top with an apron of 2 x 1 softwood applied all round (so it drops onto the router table and won't move about) and a couple of wooden turn buckles to stop it from being lifted?

Regards

Phil
Hi Phil

Cheers.

I should have said I only have access to 3 sides of the table as the other side will attach to my main bench to form letter 'T'.

I also wonder if I need a fastening systems that keeps the surfaces mated and flat to each other.

What do you reckon?

Ez
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 09:40 AM
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I should have said I only have access to 3 sides of the table as the other side will attach to my main bench to form letter 'T'.

I also wonder if I need a fastening systems that keeps the surfaces mated and flat to each other.
Ok, then, what about a turnbuckle each side and a single screw through the top (into the router table top) to keep it all in place? Alternatively make-up the router table with a rebate along the joining edge. When assembled you would in effect have a housing and the protective top could then be given a fourth side, made shallower to sit in the housing and locate the top in place. Either way you may want to stick some felt onto the underside of the protective top

Regards

Phil
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 09:53 AM Thread Starter
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Ok, then, what about a turnbuckle each side and a single screw through the top (into the router table top) to keep it all in place? Alternatively make-up the router table with a rebate along the joining edge. When assembled you would in effect have a housing and the protective top could then be given a fourth side, made shallower to sit in the housing and locate the top in place. Either way you may want to stick some felt onto the underside of the protective top

Regards

Phil
Interesting but I am not sure I am envisaging what you mean. When you say turnbuckle what do you have in mind? I think of a turnbuckle as those things you use to tension cables.

Errol
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 11:01 AM
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How about adding edging around 3 sides of the protective top? The edging would have a groove (slot? dado?) on the face that is against the router top with the top of the groove flush with the bottom of the router top. Flat turn buttons attached to the underside of the router top can be used to lock the protective top in place or unlocked to remove it. I think having the locks on 3 sides should be enough to hold the top in place.

The drawings hopefully make it easier to visualize than my description.
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 11:20 AM Thread Starter
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How about adding edging around 3 sides of the protective top? The edging would have a groove (slot? dado?) on the face that is against the router top with the top of the groove flush with the bottom of the router top. Flat turn buttons attached to the underside of the router top can be used to lock the protective top in place or unlocked to remove it. I think having the locks on 3 sides should be enough to hold the top in place.

The drawings hopefully make it easier to visualize than my description.
Aw! thanks dude, did you do those drawings just for me! you're too kind

Yea, had been sitting down watching some TV instead and my mind came up with the same idea (except I had the moving part going right through the edge piece); think your design is better and easier to make.

Nice one man. I'll give you a hand with the bigger dragons!
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-07-2012, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Oziray View Post
Make the edge banding 16mm (5/8") deeper on the protective top than the router top so it sits over the whole router top, fit flush bolts to under side of router top and drill holes into edge banding of protective top. all out of sight and nothing to get damaged or make edge banding flush with bottom of router top banding and fit plywood butterfly cleats.

Their just 2 simple methods that come to mind
Sort of the same... For the jobsite, I have 1/2" cdx plywood with 3/4" edges/cleats made up for my portable router table and one for my jobsite table saw (when on it's work-n-haul folding stand). The tops double both as work space and protection from the elements. My compound sliding miter saw on it's kickstand- I take the saw off it's stand, put it's nylon cover over it (was a tire cover), plywood table with cleats on two sides so it goes over the stand's rails.

They are just placed over/on. I need to use the equipment underneath. (Although that slot idea above / sliding on the top... is giving me ideas) I haven't found a "need" to secure it to make it earthquake proof yet. If I did, I just put a clamp on a corner. (Buckets of clamps there anyways!) I put the cleats on so it doesn't get taken by the wind or knocked off by me while scurrying around with a tool belt.

For my multi-purpose jobsite table, the router module lifts out and a blank table insert slides back in. For home, I have work tables, so I don't have covers there.

Edit-- Reread. Last paragraph, last sentence- Not "completely" accurate. If a ever do need more working space than I have, 2 sawhorses and a piece of plywood go a long way.

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 07-07-2012 at 12:24 PM.
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