Jointing alternative? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-06-2004, 10:07 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 10
 
Default Jointing alternative?

I know it's fairly common practice to use a jointing fence on a router table with a slight offset on the outfeed side. However, this just guarantees as straight edge, not a parallel edge. Also, you are limited in thickness to the height of the cutting bit.

Is there a reason why you can't use a fence on the left side of the router?

This would let you get the sides parallel, allow stock up to twice the thickness of the cutter bit (by flipping the stock over), and let you control the final width of the stock.

I've attached an image showing what I mean. Is there a problem with kickback? Given the direction of rotation, I don't think you have to worry about it grabbing and throwing your piece.

Thanks,
Kevin

ktritz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-06-2004, 10:51 AM
Registered User
 
reible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,702
   
Default

The bit will pull the wood away from the fence, I don't think you want to do that......

Ed
reible is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-06-2004, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 10
 
Default

Hmm, would the featherboards and taking small cuts prevent this?

Otherwise I suppose a piece clamped to a sled riding along a miter slot or the table edge would do the same thing.

Thanks for your reply.

Kevin
ktritz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-06-2004, 05:29 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 120
 
Thumbs down

Doing it that way you will be climb cutting which will move the wood through leaving ridges as it jerks through.
That is one of the most dangerous ways to use a router.
The router bit has to be exactly level with the outfield fence with the infield part of the fence determining the depth of cut with each pass.
You should turn the feather boards the other way and feed the wood through from the other side.

Last edited by Dewy; 11-06-2004 at 05:32 PM.
Dewy is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-06-2004, 05:59 PM
Registered User
 
reible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,702
   
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktritz
Hmm, would the featherboards and taking small cuts prevent this?

Otherwise I suppose a piece clamped to a sled riding along a miter slot or the table edge would do the same thing.

Thanks for your reply.

Kevin
The featherboards will be the "fence" in your drawing and a springier fence is not going to give you a nice finish. Sorry........ To see what I'm talking about take a router bit in your hand, held below like it would be in the router then take a scrap of wood and put it against the edge of the bit, twist the bit..... Which direction did the wood move? It moved away from your pictured fence, towards the feather boards. You always want the bit to move the wood into the fence/bearing/???.

Think about how this is done minus the router.... One side would be made flat (jointer/hand plane) then that side is used to make the other side parallel by running it along the fence of a (table saw/hand saw) then it is cleaned up with again a (jointer/hand plane). Using a sled or miter slot would require the edge against the sled or miter gauge be at 90deg.......... I'm not really sure what you are trying to do but if you explain that maybe someone here can explain how it is done.

BTW I like your drawings, nice!

Ed
reible is offline  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-06-2004, 08:27 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 120
 
Default

ktritz
On another woodworking forum someone had just got a router table and wondered why it seemed so dangerous with him being unable to get a good finish.
He was passing the timber against the fence and pushing it through the right way but had not set the bit with only a part proud of the fence.
He had set the fence well back and was trying to pass the timber between the cutter and the fence.
When he realised how wrong he was he tried the right way and was pleased with the result.
Dewy is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-07-2004, 10:15 AM
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1
 
Default

Though "taboo" according to everything I've read, I've used you're method frequently over the last six months in jointing rails and stiles for picture frame mouldings (narrow stock: 4/4" thick x 1 1/4" wide). Hope somebody has a better way to achieve parallel sides on the router table - been looking long and hard for a solution...!
ChasWahl is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-07-2004, 10:54 AM
The Router Guys

 
BobandRick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Country: Canada
First Name: Rick
Posts: 768
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktritz
I know it's fairly common practice to use a jointing fence on a router table with a slight offset on the outfeed side. However, this just guarantees as straight edge, not a parallel edge. Also, you are limited in thickness to the height of the cutting bit.

Is there a reason why you can't use a fence on the left side of the router?

This would let you get the sides parallel, allow stock up to twice the thickness of the cutter bit (by flipping the stock over), and let you control the final width of the stock.

I've attached an image showing what I mean. Is there a problem with kickback? Given the direction of rotation, I don't think you have to worry about it grabbing and throwing your piece.

Thanks,
Kevin

Trapping the piece between the router bit and the fence is NOT a safe practice. In my opinion you size your material on the table saw not the router.

Rick and Bob
The Router Guys


On January 17th, 2020 Dad passed Away at the age of 87 and I will miss him very much. If anyone is interested there is a memories website https://memories.routerworkshop.com/
BobandRick is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-07-2004, 11:08 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 10
 
Default

My main purpose is to try and find a way to get flat, parallel, and dimensional pieces out of S2S stock, or stock that has rough and uneven edges.

I suppose a jointer is the proper tool for the job, but I currently don't have one. The standard method for jointing using a router gives straight edges, but not necessarily parallel edges.

I understand that the router would be pulling the piece away from the fence, I was just hoping that small cuts and the featherboard would prevent this. Since I've not tried it, I could very well be wrong. Obviously, feeding the stock in the other direction would be dagerous as the router could catch and throw the stock.

I referred to a method using a sled above. This is kinda what I was thinking:


The sled would be braced against the 1/4" raised plate. The stock would be held against the sled with clamps to resist the pull by the router. Then, as long as the sled back was square, the piece should come out square and parallel. Then, the dimensions of the piece could be controlled by shimming against the brass pins.

What do you guys think?

Kevin
ktritz is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-07-2004, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 10
 
Default

I don't have a table saw. I have a relatively small garage shop with a CSMS, a jigsaw, and a router. I'm in the process of building the table for the router.
ktritz is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jointing with hand router simplenik Portable Routing 24 11-28-2009 06:57 AM
Bit for jointing question dabeeler Router Bits - Types and Usage 11 11-13-2007 10:57 AM
Another Question Related to Jointing dabeeler Router Bits - Types and Usage 7 11-11-2007 09:32 AM
Router Jointing Drick General Routing 1 12-19-2005 09:21 PM
jointing jimcrjfo Table-mounted Routing 6 11-23-2004 10:35 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome