the correct bit for table template routing ? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-02-2013, 03:02 PM Thread Starter
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Default the correct bit for table template routing ?

first time posting.
I am doing a template project that is a motor cycle rocker for my grandson.
My quandary is END GRAIN. I am using a 1/2" shaft 2" down shear double flute bit.
All goes well until I hit the end grain. After the first piece blew up I took a slower approach on the wicked area and got the same results. My question is would I be better off using a flush trim spiral bit? If so what is the proper bit to use spiral up or spiral down on the table mounted router with a template project ?
Also have a vacuum hooked up to the table via the router. DeWalt 221 HP

Last edited by guyokis; 12-02-2013 at 05:21 PM. Reason: left out what type of bit
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-02-2013, 06:50 PM
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Upcut spiral template... When you think spiral bits, the "UP" refers to towards the router motor... so on a router table the bit and cutters would pull chips down, pulling down on the workpiece.

Being it's a spiral pattern to the cutter, it would change to directed force on endgrain... and you might get less tearout.

Things you didn't mention is if the bit was sharp, what kind of wood being cut and how much of a depth of cut you are trying to take at a time.

With really problematics woods... sometimes it's easier to trim off within 1/8" to 1/16" with a saw before flush cutting... or sometimes lining up two opposing templates so the work piece can be flipped, so you can follow the grain.

Sharpness and depth of cut play a big hand with endgrain. It needs to ct it without grabbing and pulling.

I was going to mention backing the grain with some kind of sacrificial backer... but thought that if you are using a template or pattern, then you are most likey doing some kind of curves, which would make any backer not work right.

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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-02-2013, 09:01 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Mike,
It was a brand new bit. My tear out happened on cherry and I had at most 1/8" over burden. I'm going to take that down some more tomorrow on my band saw. Cherry is not cheap! I touched up the bit with a 2000 grain diamond stone it it worked great on some of the 1 1/4" Baltic Birch parts. Thanks again on the spiral bit tip.
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-03-2013, 11:17 AM
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end grain is very problematic. You need really sharp bits and shallow cuts to prevent tear out. Speed of router and feed rate will control burning but how much wood you try to take off at a time will effect tearing or exploding!
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-03-2013, 01:28 PM
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"My question is would I be better off using a flush trim spiral bit? If so what is the proper bit to use spiral up or spiral down on the table mounted router with a template project ?"
*****************************************
DW, maybe 621?
Nonetheless, their plungers are good tools.
Relabled Elu's from the 70's, well designed, well made.

End grain tear out, a problem? Often
Wood, albeit ubiquitous, is difficult to rout without some tearout along the grain, definitely across the grain, down or x grain x 1-cutter-width pathways, and frequently into end grain. (What's left?).

How to manage >98% of the time with no tears, safely, and timely? In stages.
Plungers are made for stage cuts. Those stages can be as fine as 1/64" or
as coarse as 20/64ths+. Cut the thickness thin enough and it will not tear out. Sharp cutters help, a feed rate = the cut rate is also advantageous.
Spiral cutters taking a full thickness, table or hand rout? An invitation to excitement. Results unpredictable.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-04-2013, 01:05 AM
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I have had success by slowly nibbling away at the two corners where tearout is a problem. I nibble at the corners until I have the entire profile cut into the corner then I finish routing as normal. You have to be very careful if you do this because it is the start of a climb cut and the bit can grab the work and pull it out of your control. If you are not fairly experienced routing I don't recommend it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-07-2013, 02:07 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, the DW 621 plunge router. table mounted with a micro adjuster and vacuum.
Update, I purchased a CMT 1/2"X 1/2" shank up spiral bit for this motorcycle rocker I'm trying to build. This bit is fantastic, it slices through the cherry like it's hot butter.
As I had said earlier I was going to take down my overburden on the band saw and I did, right down to the pencil line. I completed five pieces not a problem.
The minute I switch to the templates for fenders or a wheel,call 911. What am I doing wrong? Going up the hill is an option but a grab is a grab and I think it might be more than a piece of broken cherry cutting the butt of my thumb. When I tape my templates on to the work piece all that remains to be seen is the pencil line. I am so baffled.
Any suggestions?
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-07-2013, 06:13 PM
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Tape? As a clamp?
About as bad as it gets. Using a templet, right?
Then use clamps (toggles), stops, fences etc to crowd the work.
Moreover, I would not hesitate to screw the work to the templet if I could do it no other way..
Use tape and you'll never know when the work, due to very high cutter tranction, will pull itself of the templet.
Templates.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-08-2013, 03:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guyokis View Post
first time posting.
I am doing a template project that is a motor cycle rocker for my grandson.
My quandary is END GRAIN. I am using a 1/2" shaft 2" down shear double flute bit.
All goes well until I hit the end grain. After the first piece blew up I took a slower approach on the wicked area and got the same results. My question is would I be better off using a flush trim spiral bit? If so what is the proper bit to use spiral up or spiral down on the table mounted router with a template project ?
Also have a vacuum hooked up to the table via the router. DeWalt 221 HP
A picture is worth a thousand words and I'm sure that definitive answers will result.

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-08-2013, 06:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quillman View Post
Tape? As a clamp?
About as bad as it gets. Using a templet, right?
Then use clamps (toggles), stops, fences etc to crowd the work.
Moreover, I would not hesitate to screw the work to the templet if I could do it no other way..
Use tape and you'll never know when the work, due to very high cutter tranction, will pull itself of the templet.
Templates.
Yeah, I tried rubber cement, double stick tape, and so on, when I first started. Didn't like any of them. So, now I drill pilot holes in my masters/templates, and nail them down. I make sure I have more than enough nails, as to few and they will start to 'dance' loose. Makes nail holes, but I make sure they only go in places that will end up out of sight - the back of whatever, or glued to another piece. It's not an original idea with me, read about it being done in a professional wooden boat restoration company; also saw a video of a a professional harp maker nailing his master down.

I used to have problems with tearout too, when I first started. Found out that taking very shallow, and slow, cuts pretty much solved my problem with that. I don't normally do fancy work, so all my routing is usually a straight 1/2" flush trim bit. Works for me.

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