How to hold down small parts for long-grain cuts? - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-25-2014, 06:42 PM Thread Starter
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Default How to hold down small parts for long-grain cuts?

I was just watching an interesting video on You Tube about the Woodpeckers Coping Sled.

OK, so that's a way to hold small pieces for end-grain cuts.

This got me wondering: how should I hold small pieces for long grain cuts?
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-25-2014, 06:54 PM
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This got me wondering: how should I hold small pieces for long grain cuts?
I dunno. But the way I do it, I have some straight edges made by gluing two pieces of 1/2" plywood, which give me a nice 1" handhold. I draw a straight line on whatever I want to rout, then tack the straightedge onto it, and rout. Oh yes, I cut the piece as close to the line as reasonable, so as little as possible has to be routed. Works for me. I often do the same type of thing for short grain cuts. You might want to do it a different way, as I've had a lot of time to develop this method.

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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-25-2014, 08:45 PM
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If it's really narrow, you are better off to make the profile on a wider board and then rip it off on the TS. Otherwise, I just put one hand on the table in front of the bit to hold down until I've passed enough board through to move on the other side of the bit and then I use a push stick or drag the end of the board past the bit. Hold downs and a push stick would work too. As long as you keep your hands away from the whirly things.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-26-2014, 10:45 AM
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As long as you keep your hands away from the whirly things.
All things that lead to accidents are difficult to account for.
For that reason, use push sticks and the like to move the items past whirly things.

Or in short, do not use parts that go to the ER. Wood does not.
You want to be accident free - and be better than my signature.

  • Accident free since 10/27/12 at 3:58 pm.
  • Cursing free since 10/27/12 at 3:59 pm.
  • ...it happened in Everett, WA USA
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 01-26-2014, 09:31 PM
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Best, as mentioned, to do the profile on a larger piece then trim to size...

If it is already a long narrow piece and it can't be done that way, I've attached to larger pieces with double sided tape. What you risk with that is breaking the piece while tryin to separate it again.

I have used the method of switching sides, if that seems safely possible... but if that doesn't seem possible or it can't be mounted to a larger piece, then I go back to making it on a larger piece and trim it to size (the safest method.)

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