Metric Router Lift Availability - Router Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
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Question Metric Router Lift Availability

Since I don't have a whole lot of imperially branded tools yet, I'm interested in going metric in my garage workshop.

I'm hobbling together a router table and was looking at router lifts, however, I was unable to find any with metric mechanics. Everything available is only ruled imperially.

It appears you can only get a metric "lift" if a plunge router has metric mechanics and it is designed for above the table adjustments, e.g. Festool. From my reading it seems Festool isn't quite an option though if you're making your own router table.

Why are there no metric router lifts?

Is it a big deal if I try to build a workpiece using metric system, but some key tools, like a router lift, are not using the same system? I can't be the first person to think this is a little nuts, but I'm not experienced enough using metric system to know if I should care.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 01:13 PM
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I don't own a lift and probably never will since I use a plunger in my table but it seems to me to be a question that is similar to asking whether I have a 12" crescent wrench (adjustable spanner) or a 300 mm. Does it make a difference? If it is in regards to calculating bit height adjustment you could go with one of these Digital Tool-Setting Gauge - Lee Valley Tools

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 04:23 PM
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Steve, router lifts are a product of the US or companies that market to it, hence no metric items.

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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 04:37 PM
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My metric ratchet sets are 1/4" or 3/8" drive. I'm like Chuck - it doesn't seem to me it is going to matter. If you go-out and buy some metric-only measuring tools you will be well on your way. By the way, I work and sell products all-over the planet and metric is BY FAR the better system. If someone tells you Imperial is better - it simply means they do not understand Metric.
Metric ties linear measure to volumetric measure to weight measure. Metric is base 10. I have 10 fingers and I also have 10 toes. A cubic foot has absolutely nothing to do with a gallon, and neither of them has anything to do with a pound or an ounce. Imperial does none of these without complex calculations. In the USA, there is a sad lack of engineering documentation using metric, but that isn't metric's fault!

About 25 years ago, I won a contract to design for a Ginormous Swedish Firm, who was building in the USA - the contract was for a very handsome 8 figure number! I got the work without having the low price, but rather because I didn't complain about the required use of the Metric System - but rather I EMBRACED IT!

I laughed ALL THE WAY TO THE BANK - THE CUSTOMER PAID LIKE A SLOT MACHINE!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 05:12 PM
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Personally, in a lift, I doubt it makes any difference.

How long is a piece of string? Does it change length if you measure it in metric? I think not.

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, my question was in regard to setting bit height.

So, it sounds like whether your router settings are in metric or imperial, you just set them up with a helper tool like a guage or blocks if you need a specific height?

When using my handheld trim router, I've never personally dialed in by paying attention to the ruler markings so I didn't know how often it's used when on a table. This will be my first RT.

I had an email conversation yesterday with JessEm support. They said they actually do make metric versions for three of their lifts, but have decided to not stock them due to the low North American demand. I was, however, told to keep a lookout over the next few months though...

I just think it's obvious that if no one makes a metric lift, there is of course going to be minimal demand! I need something sooner than months from now (if it even comes).
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-05-2014, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
personally, in a lift, i doubt it makes any difference.

How long is a piece of string? Does it change length if you measure it in metric? I think not.
+1
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-05-2014, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OPG3 View Post
My metric ratchet sets are 1/4" or 3/8" drive. I'm like Chuck - it doesn't seem to me it is going to matter. If you go-out and buy some metric-only measuring tools you will be well on your way. By the way, I work and sell products all-over the planet and metric is BY FAR the better system. If someone tells you Imperial is better - it simply means they do not understand Metric.
Metric ties linear measure to volumetric measure to weight measure. Metric is base 10. I have 10 fingers and I also have 10 toes. A cubic foot has absolutely nothing to do with a gallon, and neither of them has anything to do with a pound or an ounce. Imperial does none of these without complex calculations. In the USA, there is a sad lack of engineering documentation using metric, but that isn't metric's fault!

About 25 years ago, I won a contract to design for a Ginormous Swedish Firm, who was building in the USA - the contract was for a very handsome 8 figure number! I got the work without having the low price, but rather because I didn't complain about the required use of the Metric System - but rather I EMBRACED IT!

I laughed ALL THE WAY TO THE BANK - THE CUSTOMER PAID LIKE A SLOT MACHINE!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
Not to many people here in USA do realize that they use metric system for all their life: it called MONEY. 10 pennies=dime, 10 dimes=dollar, 10 single $=10 etc. As you said metric is so simple and logical. I was born in Europe so I am familiar with it but when I came to USA I had to learn US system since I am mechanical engineer. Going back to the topic. I have INCRA Mast-R-Lift II and using setup gauges, depth mikes and such likes to set up the height of the bit was to time consuming so I bought digital display which has fractions, decimals (Imperial) and metric modes. Once you have that than it does not matter, set the "0" on the tool and you are ready to go.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-06-2014, 04:29 AM
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Steve,

most wood working is about reproducing, not measuring.

Since I don't (and don't want to) own any working digital display on any of my tools, I do work with story sticks and especially what I call measuring blocks.
For example - a groove needs to have a certain width and depth to snugly fit another part of the project - so rather than measuring twice on each of the parts, and possibly mis-reading the scale due to angles of reading, I rather create a small block of wood out of a piece of waste material, matching exactly the dimensions I need, and then use it to feel the measurement with the tips of my fingers for accuracy. You get the idea?

So even if you use a hight gauge for setting a routers depth of cut in a router table - use it as a feeler gouge rather than a measuring one, and you won't bother its scale reading inches or metrics.
Or use the piece matching that groove, to feel the hight setting of the bit is ok.
Even calipers are usually used by me that way - adjusting, locking and reproducing the "measurement" without glancing at the scale once.
By the way - those calipers were really cheap digital ones, since the battery had given up already in the shop - the locking mechanism is all I need.

I found this is way more accurate for me than any measurements.

Martin

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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-07-2014, 02:37 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the advice! I do wind up messing up many of my cuts due to measuring wrong no matter how many times I measure before cutting once. I must need better techniques.

I picked up a Triton TRA001 and I don't think I'll need a lift right now unless I'm dissatisfied with the router.

JessEm did contact me back again and was open to putting a metric lift on their production line for me. I'd advise contacting them if anyone else is in the market for a metric lift!
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