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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-07-2014, 11:13 AM Thread Starter
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while looking around for ideas for my routing table I decided I'm going to use a guard, the simplest idea I found is a wooden angle clamped or slot guided on the fence.
I have a couple of questions about this:
- is the guard lowered all the way down to the workpiece just leaving enough clearance to slide and help pressing down?
hmmm....I think I'm doing this the wrong way...please just give me some ideas about what a guard is used for and ways of setting one up the simplest way.
If this message is read by any of the guys who helped me in my " kickback scared " thread, let me thank you, all the hints I got were right on the money.
thank you in advance.
Fernando
p.s. .... this is intended for so many guys in this forum that are so smart and helpful
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-07-2014, 12:16 PM
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Fernandito, some of the guard designs have slotted screw holes so that you can adjust the gap by sliding the guard up and down. The smaller the gap under it, the safer it is. It is a little added protection for your hands. While you are using bits like an ogee or roundover that only profiles the edge of a board, most of the bit is beside or below the board and there is usually a bearing at the top so this type of operation is pretty safe unless you lose control of the board and the router throws it, leaving your hands exposed to the bit. That usually only happens if you feed the wrong way.

If you are using a straight bit or a pattern bit then the cutting edge will stick up above the board and the guard is an important safety tool in this case.

It is good to see the attitude you are taking with routing. We see many new members who are only interested in getting the job done as quickly and easily as possible. If you worry about safety first, you will still have 2 thumbs and 8 fingers when you finally decide to quit.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-07-2014, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
Fernandito, some of the guard designs have slotted screw holes so that you can adjust the gap by sliding the guard up and down. The smaller the gap under it, the safer it is. It is a little added protection for your hands. While you are using bits like an ogee or roundover that only profiles the edge of a board, most of the bit is beside or below the board and there is usually a bearing at the top so this type of operation is pretty safe unless you lose control of the board and the router throws it, leaving your hands exposed to the bit. That usually only happens if you feed the wrong way.

If you are using a straight bit or a pattern bit then the cutting edge will stick up above the board and the guard is an important safety tool in this case.

It is good to see the attitude you are taking with routing. We see many new members who are only interested in getting the job done as quickly and easily as possible. If you worry about safety first, you will still have 2 thumbs and 8 fingers when you finally decide to quit.


Fernandito,
One of the best safety devises available to you is one that you have already incorporated into you wwodworking interest, and that is your acute awareness of the possibility of getting hurt by not doing the right thing.

Your concern for your safety and therefore taking the time to ask question and going slowly is admirable. You are going to be just fine and you are really going to enjoy woodworking as you get the knack of things and understand what you are doing. This is a good thread for the forum members, especially the ones that are new to woodworking as you appear to be. Keep asking and let us know how things go for you.

Jerry
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-07-2014, 03:22 PM
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http://www.routerforums.com/table-mo...bit-guard.html

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-08-2014, 12:21 AM Thread Starter
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Hi again Mike, I tried to answer your private message but for some reason they wouldn't let me, so I have to do it here, although is not my intention to disrupt the main objective of the forum by posting personal messages. I agree with everything you told me but as I said it was just a little funny anecdote that rather than to take any offense we just laughed at it.
regards
Fernando
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-08-2014, 07:58 AM
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Fernandito,

The guard on my router table is made from plexiglass so I can see what's going on. It hinges to the top of the fence so that it can flip up equal to the thickness of the wood I am routing. The right side has a lip which the wood catches as it is fed in and that lip allows the wood to lift the guard as necessary. The design also allows me to manually flip the guard up and out of the way should I not wish to use it at all. I can post a picture if the design interests you.

Safety first!
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-08-2014, 11:22 AM
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Go ahead and post it Peter. I'd like to see how you did it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-08-2014, 11:30 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Peter, although the description is quite clear, I would very much like to see a picture of it, I like the idea of seeing what's going on underneath.
thank you
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 09:42 AM
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Default Plexiglass Router Guard

My router table was purchased at Canadian Tire; however, I feel some plexiglass could be used to make a box similar in design to the guard shown in the pics. The lip on the right works to flip the guard up as much as needed and the bolt at the back is the pivot for flipping it up out of the way.

Peter
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 01:11 PM
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I am assuming that it came with the table. Do you ever have to lift it up manually to get the board under it or does it always go up by itself? All-in-all it looks like an effective design.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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