Trouble Pattern Routing - Help Appreciated - Router Forums
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 12:54 PM Thread Starter
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Default Trouble Pattern Routing - Help Appreciated

I want to fabricate some parts for a chair. I made a pattern out of 1/2" MDF. That is the first picture.

I am using a Whiteside RFT5125 Spiral Flush Trim Solid Carbide bit, with two bearings. Two flute up cut 1/2" shank. This is the Whiteside choice for pattern routing on a router table, which is what I am doing. Second Picture.

I am using 3/4" white oak. The first pass went fine, see Picture three.

Then came the problem. See Picture four. On another portion of the pattern, the bit immediately grabbed the grain and tried to rip the workpiece out of my hand. I spared you the picture of the blood. It does not matter which direction I rout, because I don't even get to that. I put the pattern and workpiece flat on the table, then push it real slow until the bit engages the wood, and it grabs and tries to throw it. I don't have the workpiece against the bit to try routing in either direction.

Any thoughts?
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Last edited by marc82much; 03-30-2014 at 01:20 PM.
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 01:33 PM
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Double sided tape is your clamp, right?
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 01:41 PM Thread Starter
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Double sided tape is your clamp, right?
Yes.
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 01:53 PM
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How deep was the cut? You need to rough cut as close to your cut/rout line as you reasonably can, I would say under 1/8" with oak, and proceed slowly. Sounds to me like you might have been trying to take to much at a time. Need more details.

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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 02:53 PM
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I can see that is in end grain... Which as you hinted at (trying different feed directions) one direction would be easier than another... But my question is:
What did the piece look like before you started?

I guess I should explain that question...
- I noticed that is one of two small braces, to support the arms of an Adirondack styled outdoor chair
- You didn't mention what kind of wood you were making that out of, but from the pictures, it looks like a well seasoned hardwood, such as oak... and you were doing a pattern that would involve lots of end grain. Is that close to what that was?
- By picture one, and from the tear out, I'm gauging that piece as being fairly smallish in size.
- You didn't mention what sized bearings you were using before you went to a flush cut or any of the prep you did before going to your flush cut.
- You mentioned "blood"... Which previous to reading that sentence, I already had worried about that before reading that...

Here's what I would have done with that piece and see if it opens some creative ideas. I probably have 2 tooling methods I would have approached that, both based on safety and depth of cut on end grain. Both have similar prep before the actual flush cut.

On prep, I'm assuming with your cut list that these 2 pieces started out as 2 pieces from one square, each piece bisecting that square to make the two braces. So you didn't have to route out a whole lot to start with. After double taping to the pattern, you could take a bandsaw, scrollsaw, jig saw, hand coping saw (etc.) to trim the pieces down so that you don't have to route as much at a time to get it down to finished size.

Next is how it is routed. It's a small piece. This is where the safety and control part of it falls together or apart. Instead of trying to hold onto a small piece on a router table while routing (without a fence).
Hand router:
I probably would have either screwed a lug to the off back side of the pattern to mount it into a vase or mounted the pattern to a larger piece to clamp it down to a table, then hand routed it. If you start routing it with a larger bearing, then you can step the depth of cut into a finished flush cut.
Router Table:
Mount the pattern onto a larger backing piece so it is controllable and so your fingers/hands are away from the bit. Use the same bearings to step into your finish cut.

Either method would give you move control, with your hands and fingers away from the bit.

Using the second method, one problem is that if you use too large a squarish piece as the backer, you are doing the cut blind. That could be done that way by feel and checking it often. But maybe better than doing it blind, the larger backer could be rectangular, with the cut side of the pattern moved over it's edge, so you can actually see that that edge as it's being cut... Definitely more work that way (reattaching the pattern to the holding piece...)

That is just what first came to mind from reading your post and seeing the pic's. (Trying to hold onto a small piece of wood, trying to route it's endgrain...)

Part II:
The next part is that if you had followed a cut-list and cut the square "squared" that both those two braces would be cut from... that the two edges were square and the those two edges were 90* from each other... then you would have just needed to line the pattern to those edges and had one curved edge to route. Meaning, that end grain edge that blew out, could have been cut out with a saw and not needed to be routed to get that pattern...

It's an outdoor furnishing project, not a roccoco revival parlor chair. The clearances do not need to be exact. Even if you did, after a short time, weathering will affect that.

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Last edited by MAFoElffen; 03-30-2014 at 03:48 PM. Reason: Trying to keep blood out of the equation there...
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 03:52 PM
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Marc

What tools do you have?

I would have cut it on a band saw then use a spindle sander to finish the piece.

Al

Last edited by boogalee; 03-30-2014 at 03:56 PM.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
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Marc

What tools do you have?

I would have cut it on a band saw then use a spindle sander to finish the piece.

Al
I could do this (I have a spindle sander / belt sander) but I am going to make several and I thought pattern making was the right way to do it. I thought that is exactly what this bit is designed to do.
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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 05:43 PM
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Marc, are you placing your wood against a safety starting pin and pivoting it onto the bit?

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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-30-2014, 09:24 PM
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My opinion I think it is small piece, he lost control, try mounting a handle to the pattern so that you can get a better hold. If you are not comfortable with what you doing find a better way. You probably back the pressure off and it kick back
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-31-2014, 12:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boogalee View Post
I would have cut it on a band saw then use a spindle sander to finish the piece.
I hadn't realized just how small that piece is. I think you've got probably the best idea for doing it yet - except I don't have a spindle sander.

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Gather the villagers, pitchforks, torches; we march at dusk!
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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