Inverted router - overarm pin guide - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-09-2014, 01:24 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Carroll
Posts: 16
 
Default Inverted router - overarm pin guide

It seems that a large portion of router table pattern routing is done with a ball bearing trim / pattern bit riding against the pattern, rather than using an overarm pin set up to guide the cut. Wouldn't the overarm pin be better, eliminating bearing problems (seizing, etc.), and also safer with the top mounted pattern sheilding the operator from chips flying from the cutter and further shielding inappropriately placed fingers from the business end of the cutter? Only a couple of manufacturers offer overarm "pin router" arms, although it is easy enough to fashion a shop built overarm. Plain cutters cost less than bearing guided cutters.....

Many operations can be done more than one way and yes, I'm overthinking the matter, but comments on the pros / cons of overarm pins vs. bearing guided bits will be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your input.
E.Tinker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-09-2014, 02:43 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,982
 
Default

The bearings are pretty reliable and cheap to replace if needed, usually about $4 or $5. This lube will free them up and I can't remember the last bearing I had to replace since I started using it. Bearing Lubricant - Lee Valley Tools

Pin routers are more common in an industrial setting and they work fine. It's just that it is an added expense. If it is a large workpiece then you don't need to worry about getting too close to the bit. If it is a small workpiece my fingers would be too close to the bit no matter which type of system your using, guard or not. I would want to use a holding jig of some kind and the overarm might get in the way of that.

You still have to have a router table with a router mounted in it so I would say for most of us it is just an unnecessary added attachment.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-10-2014, 12:43 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Carroll
Posts: 16
 
Default

To: Cherryville Chuck
Thanks for the info re: bearing guided VS Overarm pin routing. Your reference to Lee Valley bearing lube is appreciated.
E.Tinker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-10-2014, 04:02 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,982
 
Default

You're welcome Carroll. The bit I have the most trouble with is a laminate trim bit and I don't usually spray it until after the bearing starts sticking and it still frees it up even then.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-17-2014, 11:46 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Ed
Posts: 6
 
Default Pin Routing For accuracy

Tinker:
I am right in the middle of making a form of the pin router attachment. The need stems from a set of feet for a book stand that already has a profile routed on the top of the feet. Because of this, using a bearing router bit is not going to work. The pin router attachment is not hard to build for special purpose. You need only design it to do what is needed at the time. In my case I need to cut a cove in the edges of the feet and the cove will sit just below the bead already cut.
The pin attachment will ride against the pattern I will make that takes the difference between the bead and the cove to allow the bit to access the edge to cut it. I have thought this through and found it to be the only way to get the cove cut in a uniform and clean way. I have a drawing of the pin router attachment to show. The drawing had to be squished to get it in here but this is a working print, if you need one just ask.
The jig is made from scrap stock and a piece of angle that is bolted to the riser block. The pin at the end is just a bolt with the threads removed for smooth operation. It is held to the router table withe clamps on both sides of the riser block.

Hope this helps;

Ed
Attached Images
File Type: bmp Pin router 620x280.BMP (508.6 KB, 131 views)

In God and sharp tools I trust!
routered is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-18-2014, 01:31 AM
Registered User
 
JOAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Theo
Posts: 6,108
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
This lube will free them up and I can't remember the last bearing I had to replace since I started using it.
Huh, never knew there was a special lube just for that. I just use a drop or two of Marvel Mystery Oil, dispensed from an old eye drop bottle, every time before I use my router. Since I started using that, some years back, had no problems at all with the bearings. I understand that Dextron transmission fluid will work too.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Gather the villagers, pitchforks, torches; we march at dusk!
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
JOAT is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-18-2014, 09:32 AM
Registered User
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Gene
Posts: 9,734
 
Default

An over arm router with the pin in the table works best for me.

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-18-2014, 10:06 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,982
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Howe View Post
An over arm router with the pin in the table works best for me.
I had considered a mount like that too Gene. There are some advantages to having the back of the piece on the table while you rout the face. How did you mount yours? I think I saw a picture from BJ with a bracket on a radial arm saw. I have thought that a radial drill press could be converted to one.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-18-2014, 04:01 PM
Registered User
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Gene
Posts: 9,734
 
Default

Charles,
Abashedly, I have to admit it is a unit purchased from Shopsmith. It can be used either way.
I really like having the work on top, though. Usually the work is attached to a pattern made of 3/8" material.

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-18-2014, 04:10 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,982
 
Default

Thanks Gene. I'll have to have a look at their setup.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Getting Started With A Woodworking Router. learnexperience Table-mounted Routing 9 10-22-2014 07:43 PM
Thanks for a great forum tmutchf New Member Introductions 9 03-11-2010 05:43 AM
building a Pin Router dane5547 General Routing 36 08-13-2009 03:58 AM
MLCS Daisy Pin Router Guide rstermer Jigs and Fixtures 7 07-06-2009 08:30 AM
40mm template guide harrysin Guide Bushings and Templates 144 02-22-2009 12:39 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome