Router table versus Jointer - Router Forums
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-01-2014, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
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Default Router table versus Jointer

Guys what are the drawbacks of using a router table for jointing as opposed to say a GI 8" dedicated jointer ?
I'm assuming the maximum height of a board would be fairly limited with a router table as your at the mercy of the bit height ?

But for making a coffee table maybe a router tables all I need. I want to keep as much room in my garage available as I can . A planer was the next toy
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-01-2014, 09:44 PM
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I have the same dilemma. Shop space, funds, family, etc. My projects do not exceed the machine capabilities on hand. I plane with a router sled, and joint with the router table. Ten inch band saw, small table saw. It is all I have right know. I can still do some quality stuff. In time I will have a full shop. It makes you think. Can I do this! Developing my skills along the way. You find what methods work for you. We are all different in how we approach woodworking. We share and learn.

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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-01-2014, 09:50 PM
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I think a primary purpose of a jointer is straighten cupped or twisted stock, which you can't do with a router and table. For jointing, I use a jointer. I've never tried it on my router table but in my mind I imagine it works very well.

May the grain be ever in your favor.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-01-2014, 10:19 PM
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I finally managed to buy a used Jet 6 inch jointer. Wish I had an 8 incher, but I simply don't have the room.

So, when I buy rough stock, I cut it into lengths I can work with, meaning nothing over 4-5 feet.
I use a shop made sled to rip a straight edge on each board. Most boards are bowed somewhat.
Then it is time to move to the jointer.
Flatten one side. If there is a little over hang, I knock it off with a hand plane.
Joint one edge to the flat side.
Move to the planer and thickness plane the boards.
Then it is time to rip the boards into the approximate widths.
Cut 'em into rough lengths.

From there, I go by my cutlist and cut to final length.

And that is the way I do it.
It is so nice to have that jointer sitting there ready to go. It gets a lot of use.

Hope this helps.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-01-2014, 11:06 PM
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I agree with Mike (MT Stringer).

I only use flat boards on the router table to joint the edge. (I KNOW that if the boards are not flat the jointed edge will not be right angle to the flat side...)

They should be flattened on the jointer first, so that is how I vote...

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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-02-2014, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berry View Post
I think a primary purpose of a jointer is straighten cupped or twisted stock, which you can't do with a router and table.
Using a ski setup, you can surface a board quite well. It just takes a lot of time and patience. It actually works quite well for odd shaped or irregular grained stock.

the inch and quarter or inch and a half surface planing bits from magnate.net work very well.

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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-02-2014, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for input guys . I can see having to get a jointer at some point . Was going to go with a GI 8" as for some reason I read a lot about people wanting an 8" after owning a 6" ?

I really want to do small stuff though , as I love coffee tables with multiple strips of wood

Last edited by RainMan 2.0; 07-02-2014 at 01:02 AM.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-02-2014, 02:18 AM
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I've had an 8" long bed for 15 to 20 years now and wouldn't want anything smaller. I've done edges on stock up to 11 feet or so and I often need the extra 2" of width. When I'm ripping narrower pieces out of a board I usually have the table saw and the jointer running at the same time so that I can clean the saw cut off one edge before ripping the next off.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-02-2014, 08:52 AM
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I use a shop made sled with wedges to level the board and then run it through my planer. I also have a dedicated plywood router table about 4' long that I put on saw horses as an edge jointer. I leave a router base attached to the table and cycle my router from plunge to table. Both work fine for me.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-02-2014, 07:55 PM
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I have the same delema space $, etc. For a simple joiner jig check out "izzy swan' on you tube. With scrap lumber you can make it for $0. It allows you to cut a straight edge on a table saw on any board then you put that straight edge on the fence to cut the opposite edge to whatever width you desire.
I am new to woodworking but I have been pleased with the results.
Good luck
Ken
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