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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2007, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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hi i am trying to use router table as edge jointer-results only so-so am using a 3/8 " strait bit 1/4 shank should i use larger bit with 1/2 " shank any ideas i am using plastic laminate for my offset on outfeed end but edges arent
perfect still show some gaps can u help or should i just buy a jointer
thanks Larry t
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2007, 11:18 AM
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When you're running the stock through, press the board against the outfeed side of the fence once you get it going..

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2007, 11:35 AM
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W e l c o m e . . A b o a r d !!

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-08-2007, 12:17 PM
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Hi Larry

Mike's right on ,, But try this tip

Once you start the pass stop just after about 6" into the pass find some playwood/MDF stock that's true and clamp it to the router table top,,,clamp the board so the stock you want to put on a clean true edge can just slide by free but not to free, then once you have the board clamped down on both ends pull the stock out and try it one more time, the clamped board will keep the board up to the fence and will stop the board snipe on the end of the pass...
If you have TWO feather boards they will also do the trick,but use two of them one just after the cut and one down from the bit about 6" to 8".
Besure and use a push block to push the stock by the bit.

But for the best job use the right tool for the right job,,,,Jointer...


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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry t
hi i am trying to use router table as edge jointer-results only so-so am using a 3/8 " strait bit 1/4 shank should i use larger bit with 1/2 " shank any ideas i am using plastic laminate for my offset on outfeed end but edges arent
perfect still show some gaps can u help or should i just buy a jointer
thanks Larry t



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Last edited by bobj3; 09-08-2007 at 12:23 PM.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2007, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry t
hi i am trying to use router table as edge jointer-results only so-so am using a 3/8 " strait bit 1/4 shank should i use larger bit with 1/2 " shank any ideas i am using plastic laminate for my offset on outfeed end but edges arent
perfect still show some gaps can u help or should i just buy a jointer
thanks Larry t
The simple method that I use for a true edge is to clamp a straight edge to the board and run the router with a straight bit along the length.

Safety note.............Left hand removed to operate camera!
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2007, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysin
The simple method that I use for a true edge is to clamp a straight edge to the board and run the router with a straight bit along the length.

Safety note.............Left hand removed to operate camera!

Hi Harry,

I heard Bob, of Bob & Rick, mention this on one of his shows...
Using routers' baseplate, that may not be equi-distant from edge to bit center around the base perimiter will cause problems if you waiver just a little bit while cutting.
He used a square baseplate against a straight edge.

Using a Template Guide would remove the dependence on the baseplate also...

... and, of course, the flush-trim bit is always a nice option too.

Oh, I think you could have left your left hand on... not worth sacrificing it just to take a picture! ... just kidding... (the router wasn't running... was it?)

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2007, 11:10 PM
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Joe, if I purchased a round base router and found the base to be eccentric to the cutter, it would be returned for refund in a flash. The beauty of a round base is that you can rotate it as you go along, especially around corners. The only photo-shoot I recall where a machine was running was the "multi-purpose cube", where I was able to stand back from the lathe to take the shot. You know me Joe, if there was the slightest excuse for using a template guide I would use one, however for trimming a straight edge a template of sorts would be required, also for a bearing cutter, not only would a straight edge be required, but also a means to steady the router. In my usual humble opinion, both of these methods would turn a simple two minute job into something else.

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2007, 11:25 PM
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Harry, I believe what Joe is referring to was one episode of Router Workshop where they were performing the same operation as you were. The comment was if you are using a router with a round base and the cutter is not centered to the base then IF you turned the router during the operation the result may be not so accurate of an operation. However a template guide on a non centered base would not be any better. They suggested using a square base plate. Of course one should always center the base to the collet and chuck as any base I have seen are not automatically centered just by screwing on the base as there is wiggle room in the holes drilled. You must use a centering tool. Some router plates like the Dewalt have one flat side for use on straight edge cuts.

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Last edited by challagan; 09-09-2007 at 11:40 PM.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2007, 11:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by challagan
Harry, I believe what Joe is referring to was one episode of Router Workshop where they were performing the same operation as you were. The comment was if you are using a router with a round base and the cutter is not centered to the base then IF you turned the router during the operation the result may be not so accurate of an operation. They suggested using a square base plate. Of course one should always center the base to the cutter as most bases just don't screw down and they are set. You use the centering tool supplied with the router and I don't see why anyone would want to twirl the router anyway during an operation like this on purpose. Some router plates like the Dewalt have one flat side.

Corey
It was in the program about Construction Tips... Bob said that some routers DO NOT have perfect circular bases and specifically mentioned it... That's why he used a square base plate. If anyone has more questions about it, it looks like it's up to Bob or Rick... (they were there)

He was using it to joint two boards at the same time with one cut... Using a straight edge clamped on top of one board to be jointed... the other board was bench clamped across from the first one just so the 3/4" bit could cut both boards when the router was run against the straight edge.

Their boards looked to be good sized... maybe 8' long!

Perfect fit all the time...

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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-10-2007, 02:44 AM
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Thanks guys for that information, it's nice to see that you both have retentive memories, unlike me! The truth is I haven't re-checked my Makita 3612C for about five years so I just went out and did so by chucking a half inch rod and checking from the outside of the rod to one edge of the base whilst rotating the chuck by hand to make sure the rod was true. I then took readings at the four points of the compass and there was an error of 0.005", which I think is probably of no consequence especially for the job of cleaning up the edge of a board because it's extremely unlikely that the router would rotate more than a few degrees in either direction, and whilst I'm no mathematician, I'm sure that any error would be of academic interest only. Don't get me wrong guys, I have nothing against other people using whatever shape base they feel comfortable with, it;s just that I was trained with a round base and have had a lot of success using this shape. I'm sure you have all seen the odd project of mine using my little Bosch router with a flat on one side! No apologies for the long reply because the forum has been a bit quiet for the last few days.

Harry



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