Do you use a mitre gauge on a table? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-20-2007, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12
 
Default Do you use a mitre gauge on a table?

I just assembled my bosch router table and got my craftsman router ( thanks for the reviews) mounted up.

It comes with a mitre slot on the table but no mitre gauge. I can see where a mitre gauge would be useful for sliding stock perpendicular to the fence but is that a normal thing to do? I'm a total neophyte with routers and router tables.

If you do use a mitre gauge did you buy one and if so what make?
neoshed is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-20-2007, 08:47 PM
Marine Engineer
 
kp91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Doug
Posts: 4,521
 
Default

I use the Oak park setup http://us.oak-park.com/catalogue.html?list=RTS-MGS- , which references off of a guide bushing instead of a slot. If you are interested in getting one, sign up for their mailing list, and you'll get a discount coupon every month or so.

For end cuts on short pieces, I often use a square push block that rides against the fence, simple and easy. This helps prevent tear out on the back of stock as well.

Doug
1 John 1:9
Fredericksburg, VA




http://disasterreliefeffort.org/
kp91 is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-20-2007, 09:39 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

Hi neoshed

Here's just one of many,Rockler sells them also..

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops..._safety_anchor

BUT you can make your own quick and easy with just some parts and some scrap wood..


===========================
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoshed
I just assembled my bosch router table and got my craftsman router ( thanks for the reviews) mounted up.

It comes with a mitre slot on the table but no mitre gauge. I can see where a mitre gauge would be useful for sliding stock perpendicular to the fence but is that a normal thing to do? I'm a total neophyte with routers and router tables.

If you do use a mitre gauge did you buy one and if so what make?



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


bobj3 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-21-2007, 12:02 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12
 
Default

thanks for the replies....I think I'll go with the push block idea
neoshed is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-21-2007, 12:16 PM
Retired Moderator
 
challagan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,126
 
Default

That's what I do, I have never really found a miter guage of much help and on most for me it's to far removed from the area to be safe. For some jobs a miter sled is of more use as well and removes much of the safety concerns.

Corey

My Carving Website: The Iowa Woodcarver
http://iowacarver.tripod.com/
challagan is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-21-2007, 01:32 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Richard
Posts: 387
 
Default

Hi: If you are going to cut accross the grain, as in doing door rails you will need something to guide the wood. I would suggest that you look into a sled that allows the work to be clamped down for feeding through the bit. Some of the sleds use a miter slot as the guide, and some others use tyour fence itself to guide the work.
Rockler, Infinity, and others sell these sleds. The one from Infinitytools, has a base plate made from 3/8ths thick aluminum, which should be about as rigid as you would reequire. Hope this helps. Woodnut65
Woodnut65 is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-22-2007, 09:55 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Country: United States
First Name: jerry
Posts: 558
 
Default

If you use a miter gauge in a miter slot the fence and the bar of the gauge must be parallel,not so with a sled.

Regards

Jerry
jerrymayfield is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-24-2007, 06:58 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Country: United States
First Name: AlexH
Posts: 3
 
Default

I remember when I was building my table, many told me the miter slot was worthless. But I put one in anyway. I must say I use it all the time with my Incra guage. I guess it is what you get used to.
AlexH is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-24-2007, 09:30 AM
Honored Member
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,391
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

On the router table it's push blocks all the time, for rails usually a piece of 3/4" MDF about 5" square, no chance of a botched job.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-24-2007, 10:47 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

Just my 2 cents on the miter slot or to say the mitre gauge sled...they work just fine as long you don't try and use the fence and the mitre type sled at the same time.

In away you are trying to use two fences at the same time and if that's the case both need to be parallel but you can use the fence as a stop guage as long it's out a bit out on the end of the pass or to say on the out feed end of the table..

This will let the stock go by the bit with out jaming or getting hung up on the fence.
The track for the sled can be off just a bit because the router table as one cutting point unlike a table saw...BUT the wider the boards the more the error will show up but most of the time the stock is less than 6" wide the norm..

But I also agree a push block is the best way and just use the fence for the guide and keep the bearing out of play most of the time..
I have found out if you use wider boards and then rip them to right size works best for me...this keeps the rip out down to a min. and if you get on one you can just cut it off with the rip job after the router did it's work...plus all the parts are the same size the norm...this works great for making cabinet doors and boxes,drawers,...etc.


=============




"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


bobj3 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beall Tilt Box Versus Wixey Angle Gauge bennybbc Tool Reviews 4 02-04-2010 01:01 PM
Oak Park Mitre Gauge - Need Setup Help.. Chris H Jigs and Fixtures 3 07-06-2008 11:39 PM
Opinions on the Osborne mitre gauge Scotty Tool Reviews 0 01-14-2007 04:52 PM
Sold: Router Table or Table Top -Sam- Woodworking Classifieds 10 01-29-2005 10:15 PM
miter gauge for table saw, help delroy33 Tools and Woodworking 3 10-27-2004 05:01 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome