UHMW or HMW for table top? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-20-2008, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
 
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Default UHMW or HMW for table top?

Anyone used either of these materials as inlays or even the table top?

Due to its unique lubricating properties, it would certainly make for a slick table (perhaps too slick?).

Just wondering.

Also - anyone know what a full sheet (5X10X1/4) costs of the UHMW or the HMW? I checked a few local prices and found I could by a cutting board at marshalls cheeper and just cut strips myself...

Thanx as always.
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-20-2008, 10:56 AM
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It is a very durable surface with low friction, but I think it would be a lot better as a thin film over another material for strength than it would be as a structural material. You can buy it from www.mcmaster.com . A 2' square piece 1/2" thick is about $50. The cutting boards are likely HDPE rather than UHMW-PE, which is similar, but not as tough or as slippery. Mcmaster sells adhesive backed UHMW PE film 0.020" thick (#85655K15). A 2' square sheet would be about $12.
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-20-2008, 11:18 AM
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Hi brettmansdorf

It works very well and it's not to slick, but slick is good for a router table

http://www.routerforums.com/45518-post1.html


And you'er right on think cutting boards...


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Quote:
Originally Posted by brettmansdorf
Anyone used either of these materials as inlays or even the table top?

Due to its unique lubricating properties, it would certainly make for a slick table (perhaps too slick?).

Just wondering.

Also - anyone know what a full sheet (5X10X1/4) costs of the UHMW or the HMW? I checked a few local prices and found I could by a cutting board at marshalls cheeper and just cut strips myself...

Thanx as always.



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

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http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

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Last edited by bobj3; 01-21-2008 at 02:27 PM.
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-21-2008, 02:11 PM
 
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Default UHMW Polyethylene

UHMW can be too slick for some vacuum tables -- the workpiece can go spinning off the UHMW unless it is clamped properly.

One of the manufacturers of UHMW is Garland Manufacturing in Maine.
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-21-2008, 09:22 PM
 
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I would think some plastic laminate over 1" of substrate would do you just as well in the slippery deapartment. It's quite durable, easy to apply and is prolly little cheaper (and just think of the custom colors you got to choose from!)
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-22-2008, 12:48 AM
 
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Default I vote laminate

A few years back I toured a manufacturing company and apparently went so ga-ga over the huge hunks of uhmw all over the place that they felt sorry for me.
About a week later a huge box loaded with about 75 lbs of the stuff showed up at my house.
It's great when positioned to slide up against something else smooth, like a miter slot, another piece of uhmw, phenolic, plastic laminate.
I've used it in dozens of things. I would not use it as a table surface. It's relatively easy to gouge or dent. You can easily dig your fingernail into it. It's also possible to scratch it and for it to wear.
Check out jigs that include it. You'll almost never see it positioned to come in sliding contact with the wood.

Jim
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-22-2008, 03:02 AM
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Most commercial router tables have tops built from a plastic laminate like Formica or Laminex brands. If there was a better choice they would use it. UHMW and HDPE work much better for jigs and fences.

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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 06:53 PM
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I agree with most of the other posters - it's too slick for a table top, and may not bee very hard. I just built a table with a 3/4" piece of phenolic for the top. Works great!
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 01-31-2008, 07:40 PM
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Hi Mike

I agree with you most of the time but on this one I do disagree..

Have you tried to bend a 3/4" thick UHMW or HDPE stock, they don't .

That's why they use it on fences, it stays true and it's slick so the stock can slide by easy...just like the Oak-Park box joint/spacer jigs..

I think they don't use it on tops because of the cost..the last time I checked on a 3/4" x 4' x 8' over 250.oo...dollars that would push the price of a router table out of site for most..when a laminated top will do the trick for much less..

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike
Most commercial router tables have tops built from a plastic laminate like Formica or Laminex brands. If there was a better choice they would use it. UHMW and HDPE work much better for jigs and fences.



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 02-02-2008, 08:41 AM
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another thing about UHMW is that it is very sensitive to temps. It will grow and warp with only a small change in temp.
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