Routing end grain - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-12-2004, 10:19 PM Thread Starter
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Unhappy Routing end grain

While making a toy for my Grandkids, I had a problem rounding over a narrow piece across the end grain. The grain was not exactly perpendicular to the cut, but more diagonal. The piece was irregular in shape so I had to use a guide bearing on the bit. Routing on one side was OK because it was cutting down the grain, but routing the opposite side was routing up the grain. It kicked back on me so bad that I had to finish the cut with a rasp. I thought of using a bull nose bit, but I don't have one. Does anyone have any suggestions?

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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-13-2004, 09:02 AM
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I don't have a bull nose bit either I just use a simple round over bit on both sides kick back I never had a problem with thankfully.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-13-2004, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pop_pop1
While making a toy for my Grandkids, I had a problem rounding over a narrow piece across the end grain. The grain was not exactly perpendicular to the cut, but more diagonal. The piece was irregular in shape so I had to use a guide bearing on the bit. Routing on one side was OK because it was cutting down the grain, but routing the opposite side was routing up the grain. It kicked back on me so bad that I had to finish the cut with a rasp. I thought of using a bull nose bit, but I don't have one. Does anyone have any suggestions?
Before I answer: Can I ask if you were using a fulcrum pin? and What was the radius of the router bit?

Rick and Bob
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-13-2004, 11:24 PM Thread Starter
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Yes and No. I tried it both ways. I had pretty much the same results. I could get it to go a little farther with the pin, but when I got to the point that the grain was against the cut, it would catch and try to pull the work piece through the cutter. I forgot to mention, it was Yellow Popular that I was working with.
The radius of the bit was 3/8", and it was a new bit.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-19-2004, 10:07 AM
 
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Having watched Router Workshop when it was available -- our local PBS station is sporadic with the scheduling

I have noticed you use a pin as a fulcrum point -- in 30 years, I have never used a fulcrum point with my router and I have never had a kick back.

Can you explain the advantage of a fulcrum point?
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-19-2004, 10:29 AM
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Support the work piece when doing external table routing without a fence. When feeding the piece into the cutter the piece will not be knocked away (kickback).
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-19-2004, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pop_pop1
Yes and No. I tried it both ways. I had pretty much the same results. I could get it to go a little farther with the pin, but when I got to the point that the grain was against the cut, it would catch and try to pull the work piece through the cutter. I forgot to mention, it was Yellow Popular that I was working with.
The radius of the bit was 3/8", and it was a new bit.
Yes, Yellow Popular is a bit gnarly, but it is only a 3/8" roundover bit and a new router bit at that. This shouldn't be a problem, I have no answers other than maybe it just happened that one time.

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-19-2004, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RouterUser
Having watched Router Workshop when it was available -- our local PBS station is sporadic with the scheduling

I have noticed you use a pin as a fulcrum point -- in 30 years, I have never used a fulcrum point with my router and I have never had a kick back.

Can you explain the advantage of a fulcrum point?
The pin is not a big problem when using a 1/4" roundover but lets use a 3/4" cove router bit and now we have a problem getting your material through the moving cove bit to the pilot bearing. The fulcrum pin just gives added support and safety.

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-22-2004, 01:24 PM
 
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back to the original end grain problem.. could you try a climb cut, for just that one area?

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