Sanding Letters After Cutting - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-18-2019, 09:25 AM
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Red face Don't paint letters by hand

For future reference, it's easier to spray paint over the letters and then just sand off the over spray with an orbital sander. That way the sanding doesn't need to be perfect! Good luck.
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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 05:50 PM
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Rout the lettering, then spray paint the letters, not worrying about getting it on the surface around them. When it is dry, sand the surface of the sign to remove the paint from all but the letters. Then use a roller with just enough stain to stain the board surface, keeping it out of the letters.

Another way -

Stain and finish the sign blank. Then, cover the entire board surface with packing or blue tape. Rout the lettering. Then spray paint the routed lettering. When it's dry, remove the tape and the sign is complete.

I've done it both ways, but usually prefer the second method. Good carbide bits will leave clean and crisp lettering, requiring no sanding.

I work in a park too, but mostly drive the train that you can see in my avatar and fix the park electrical problems, but have also made signs.

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Last edited by CharleyL; 08-20-2019 at 05:55 PM.
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 09:24 PM
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Use K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid). Cheap too. Cut sanding belt into 6" lengths, put a hole in the center. Put it together. Bolt, nut, washers, will work fine. I would want it in a drill rather than a drill press. Should work as well as anything you buy. First photo was supposed to be last.
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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-20-2019, 10:30 PM
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I agree with several that the fairly wet wood is coating your bits. Get some blade cleaner and soak and scrub them clean. A clean, sharp bit should not require sanding. If the lettering is raised, use a hard roller to roll on paint over the top of the letters, then paint any other raised areas (faster and easier than painting the letters.

Or if it's one color and the letters are not raised, paint the well dried wood, then route the letters, then a few coats of protective finish over the top.

You might get a moisture meter to test the wood for dryness. You don't want more than 5-6 percent moisture. So much green wood is just too wet to work with. Kiln dried wood is more expensive, but cuts and holds up better. The other thing is that new pine grows so fast that the wood between rings is thick and soft. Once it dries, you might have to sand the surface before you make any cuts.

I think a sanding mop could damage the raised edges of your letters, so I'd definitely go for cleanup with some bit cleaner. Trend is what I use. https://www.amazon.com/Trend-CLEAN-5...gateway&sr=8-2 About $14. It surprised me how much better the blade cut after cleaning. I cut a lot of pine.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.

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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-21-2019, 02:30 AM
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Are you using a template and the router has a bushing as your doing the routing?

Btw ,welcome to the forum

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-27-2019, 11:56 AM
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Just remember the slowest part of nearly all work is the prep work, and that will always be sanding. I know this due to painting yachts for nearly a dozen years. The painting is the easiest part, and better (clever ways) can be done to make that neat no matter what. Tape is your friend here, as well some have stated, paint the letters first, and outer last (multiple way of doing this, including using Vaseline (etc..) inside the letters (or tape, etc..) and if you do get a tad blue on the inside, you can always touch that up with a artist brush with fast and good results without tape, etc..
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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-27-2019, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainMan 2.0 View Post
Are you using a template and the router has a bushing as your doing the routing?
Btw ,welcome to the forum
Looks like bullnose would do a REAL clean job here, in a template.
If you have to make a lot of these, spend time in making the template the best, so they all will come out the same and clean.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 07:32 PM
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I have used the method of spray painting the letters after routing them and have good luck with it. Just make sure that paint is good and dry before attempting sanding or it will clog your sanding pads and dust will stick inside your lettering.
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