expensive table tops - Router Forums
 25Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 12:11 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Dan
Posts: 2
 
Default expensive table tops

Why are some router table tops so incredibly expensive -- $500 to $1000? Are they worth it? I'm trying to decide what to buy/build for my good-for-life table router. I'm inclined to build the cabinet myself but wondering how much I should spend on the top.

Any thoughts?
meyster2 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 12:32 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Country: United States
Posts: 254
 
Default

My approach to a router table top was to use a Formica-covered sink cutout I acquired for very little money and laminate it to a piece of plywood I had laying around. I spread an even coat of PVA glue on both surfaces then clamped them together on the very flat top surface of my table saw. I added clamping cauls of dense wood to put even pressure on the entire surface of the workpiece and left it to "cook" for 24 hours.

I then set up guides for my router and routed out the opening for the phenolic router plate. After plowing out a dado with the table saw, an aluminum miter track was installed.

The result is very flat and even if it doesn't last for the rest of my life, I can make two or three more for less than I would have spent for a commercially-available piece.

But your situation could be different than mine.
vchiarelli likes this.
163481 is offline  
post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 01:22 PM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,477
 
Default

I get free sink cutouts from a local cabinet and countertop company. The owner says they just toss them in the dumpster since there is no further use for them. Right now I have about 5 of them sitting under the workbench, waiting to tell me what they want to be in their next life.
vchiarelli likes this.

John T.
Life is like water-skiing; if you slow down, you go down.
Knothead47 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 01:34 PM
Registered User
 
PhilBa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Country: United States
First Name: phil
Posts: 1,046
 
Default

500 for a router table top??? what's it made of? Estonian Birch harvested under a full moon?

Making a top is fairly easy and cheap. There are lots of plans and advice out there for the searching. Probably the most daunting for newbies is cutting out the opening for the router plate. Templates and a router make easy work of that, too. Frankly, I think it's a rite of passage for wood workers.

I built mine from a 3/4" (18mm) baltic birch core and laminated a 1/4" hardboard layer on either side. Topped it off with formica and lots of poly on the bottom. Edged it with hardwood and chamfered it. Total cost - probably $30 though the only thing I bought specifically for it was the formica. It's rock solid.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20150503_122403.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	515.2 KB
ID:	132001  

vchiarelli, ksidwy and Stargate like this.

Last edited by PhilBa; 07-16-2015 at 02:26 PM. Reason: typo patrol
PhilBa is offline  
post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 01:43 PM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 3,486
 
Default

My Bosch 1181 has not failed me yet...prior to that it was 3/4 ply with a clamped down wooden fence...

Haven't found the Bosch letting me do anything I didn't before...except dust collection...

If I were to have it all, horizontal table and vertical bits for panels...

In my situation I could not need more...your needs may be different...table top builds are a-plenty...

Many threads and many designs...buy tools with that extra money...

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GIVE A MAN a fish and you feed him for a day.
Teach him how to fish and you feed him for his life time.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is offline  
post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 01:50 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 11,921
 
Send a message via Skype™ to Mike
Default

Dan, one of the best table tops is among the simplest to make. 3/4" Baltic birch plywood with a HPL like Formica on both sides. This is how the Router Workshop table was constructed. You can make reference marks on it with pencil; a quick spray with window cleaner and a swipe with a rag and it's clean. You can spend more or less money and you will not find a table top that is superior to this. Wood glides across the Formica with ease.

Forum Greeter James Wade uses his clamped to a Workmate. Retired Moderator Deb has an Incra system set up on hers. Your router table must perform well; it doesn't need to devour all your floor space... it just has to do its job. Not sure if you will like it? Build the Economy table top from 3/4" phenolic impregnated Baltic birch plywood.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	James Wade table.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	295.3 KB
ID:	132009  

Click image for larger version

Name:	incra%20mount.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	395.6 KB
ID:	132017  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Fence 002.JPG
Views:	60
Size:	44.6 KB
ID:	132025  

Click image for larger version

Name:	VacGuard 11.JPG
Views:	61
Size:	42.5 KB
ID:	132033  


Mike
"Living in the D" (this means Detroit!)
"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"
Mike is offline  
post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 01:50 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Country: United States
First Name: 4D
Posts: 1,169
 
Default

You don't even need an insert plate. My first table I routed a pocket in the back to fit the router base into. Screwed down through the top to hold it in place. Some routers are better for this than others.
4DThinker is offline  
post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 02:01 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 11,921
 
Send a message via Skype™ to Mike
Default

Nick, why not build this simple dust collection fence? All you need is a 2 x 6"(or 2 1 x 8" glued together like I used), a 2-1/4" hole saw and a set of C clamps. It works very well and the cost is hard to beat.

I suggest you build two of these and cut 1/16" off the leading face on one of them. Now you will have a regular fence and a jointing fence.

"Keep it simple"
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Fence 001.JPG
Views:	56
Size:	40.1 KB
ID:	132041  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Fence bottom.JPG
Views:	57
Size:	32.6 KB
ID:	132049  

bryansong and gjackson52 like this.

Mike
"Living in the D" (this means Detroit!)
"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Last edited by Mike; 07-16-2015 at 02:04 PM.
Mike is offline  
post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 02:29 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 1,424
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Nick, why not build this simple dust collection fence? All you need is a 2 x 6"(or 2 1 x 8" glued together like I used), a 2-1/4" hole saw and a set of C clamps. It works very well and the cost is hard to beat.

I suggest you build two of these and cut 1/16" off the leading face on one of them. Now you will have a regular fence and a jointing fence.

"Keep it simple"
Another way to handle the offset needed for jointing an edge is to glue a strip of HPL to the outfeed face, file a shallow bevel on the leading edge next to the cutout. My first fence had a strip of vertical grade laminate (0.030" thick) glued to the face - way easier than fooling with putting a shim behind the outfeed facing as I do now.

Tom
tomp913 is offline  
post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-16-2015, 04:17 PM
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Country: United States
Posts: 254
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
way easier than fooling with putting a shim behind the outfeed facing as I do now.

Tom
That's what I was planning to do. How do you find this a problem?
163481 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Router Table for Incra LS Positoner completed! Michael H Table-mounted Routing 35 03-19-2015 01:40 PM
Resurrected bird table Coleve Show N' Tell 16 12-07-2013 07:05 AM
Dust Evacuation on Router Table Guitarman1 Table-mounted Routing 15 04-29-2013 02:51 AM
Custom Ellipical Poker Table AzViper Show N' Tell 29 01-21-2012 03:41 PM
For Sale: RS 500 Router Table - routertabledepot.com sheridan Woodworking Classifieds 1 08-20-2009 10:51 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome