Advice needed. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-13-2015, 07:45 PM Thread Starter
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Default Advice needed.

I have four pieces of white oak, 3/4" thick, 4 1/2" wide and 6" long. I need to rout a 1/2" cove round each one but I am worried about tear out on the ends. I know that routing the sides should cope with this tear out but if it doesn't I'm hooped. Would it pay to clamp the pieces side by side with a scrap piece last and make all the passes needed to complete the profile then do the side passes as usual. Oldrusty.
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-13-2015, 09:44 PM
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I had to do that on the end grain of pine yesterday, I used my table router and pushed the end grain past the bit, along the fence, using a square of mdf as a backup piece, so the end grain isn't the last thing the bit cuts.

I know it's on here (this forum) somewhere but found this easier.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-13-2015, 10:04 PM
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I use a backer for all my end cuts router and TS, a good habit to be in
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 01:52 AM
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As others advised utilizer a backer as well as taking very light cuts.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 02:47 AM Thread Starter
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I also do this backer board thing but I want to cut four boards at the same time. I've never tried it before. Al
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 08:00 AM
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As you are aware, routing across end-grain caries the danger of tear-out. The best solution I have found is to use lead-in and trail-out pieces clamped firmly to the work-piece. Depending upon the configuration of the assembly you can cut with the assembly flat against the table, or perpendicular to the table by clamping the assembly to a thick piece of stock and sliding the now-vertical assembly (firmly) against a fence and past the cutter. If you have over-sized stock you can cut the end-grain first, then cut the stock to size to remove any irregularities (tear out) and then cut the parallel grain. If the work-piece is of a configuration that militates against clamping anything to it, glue the lead-in and trail-out pieces to it, make your cross-grain cuts, and then remove the glued-on pieces with a saw or other appropriate cutter.

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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 08:09 AM
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Continuous feed one behind the other, then follow the last one with a backer board. Don't leave any spaces between them or you will get tear out. Do the end grain first, then the long grain the same way. If you get any tear out on the end grain the long grain cuts should remove it. For 1/2" cove I would do it in 2 passes, followed by a "cleaning pass" where the bit has almost nothing to cut.

I personally would do them one at a time with a backer board behind each of them. I think it's a bit safer to do it this way, unless you have hundreds to do - then I would be considering a full set up with feather boards, a stock feeder, etc. You can use the same backer board behind each piece. Once the router bit cuts the backer board at one depth setting, it will still work for the other pieces.

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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 08:19 AM
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cut the end grain...
rip to width...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 09:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldrusty View Post
I also do this backer board thing but I want to cut four boards at the same time. I've never tried it before. Al
I wouldn't recommend trying to cut 4 at a time, too hard to maintain control. Stick to one. I also use a push "block". Rout the end first and then the following side. If you do get a little tearout it will be removed on the side pass. If you are really concerned make more than one pass on the ends only cutting maybe 2/3 the first pass.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Newman View Post
As others advised utilizer a backer as well as taking very light cuts.
I disagree with this. Taking more passes only dulls the router bits and does little to reduce tear out.

Backer boards are the way to go.


Just remember what my father always said, " Half the people in this world are below average!", and everything in life will make a hellova lot more sense.
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