Tenons on the Router Table - Router Forums
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 02:29 PM Thread Starter
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Default Tenons on the Router Table

Hi- I'm building an equipment rack for my workshop. I'm using 2x4 lumber I've milled down to get it flat, straight and smooth. I'm going to use mortise and tenon joints and I want to make my tenons on the router table. I've never done any mortise and tenon joinery so I'm looking for suggestions on how to go about making the tenons (mortises not a problem, got a mortise machine as a Christmas gift). I'm thinking I'll rough cut them on the bandsaw and then finish them up on the router table. I'm doing it that way so as to minimize dust. I've looked in a couple of reference books and they indicate one can use the miter gauge and use the fence as a depth stop to set the length of the tenon. The books also say to use the largest diameter straight bit one has to do the routing. What do you think of that advice, good, bad or indifferent? Is there a better way? I have to make 14 tenons all the same size. Thanks for your input.
Bob S
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 05:26 PM Thread Starter
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Very interesting links. Unfortunately I am not equipped to make mortices for loose tenons in the ends of my long boards, the boards will not fit lengthwise into the machine and the ceiling in my workshop is too low to allow me to set the long boards on end on the router table. Do you think the procedure I originally described will work? I'd hate to make a bunch of firewood out of the lumber it took me so long to mill.
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Bob S
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 06:30 PM
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is something like this what you're trying to do?
I did these free hand, No router table needed.

http://www.routerforums.com/attachme...s-dcp_5253.jpg
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 06:31 PM
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You can use a surface planing bit, and the way you describe should be just fine. You should get a very good finish if you're just cleaning up the rough cut of the bandsaw.

You could also make the shoulder cuts on a table saw and then do the cheek cuts on the bandsaw.

That's going to be one sturdy rack!

http://magnate.net/index.cfm?event=s...roup&theID=136

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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 06:48 PM
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Hi Bob S.

Long boards can be a pain..that's why the floating tenons work so well for that job.
Like many woodworkes I have done it both way but with a tenon jig on the table saw you will still run into the error of long stock cutting the tenons on the table saw, you could do it outside but you have alot of mass that you will need to control...or just lay it flat on the table saw but again it's alot of mass to get cut just right on the button the shoulder cut is the hard part but you will still need to put in the pockets...so to say one easy jig will do the job easy..

You can make a quick jig and use the plunge router to do the job.
All you need to do is take some stock a put in a slot for the brass guide to run in.
3/4" wide slot works best and as long as you want it to be..then just clamp it to the end on the stock and plunge out the pockets on both parts with the same jig..
That way they both will line up right on...
Just clamp the long boards in the work bench vise then clamp on the jig..
To make your floating tentons just use the router table to round over all the edges so they slip right in...

.....

jig looks like the one below but out of wood without all the knobs and rods just a slot will do the job.

The one below can just be clamped in place then drop and slot
http://www.routerforums.com/attachme...plate-8305.jpg
http://www.routerforums.com/attachme...plate-8306.jpg

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Last edited by bobj3; 04-23-2008 at 08:40 PM.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 06:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourleftpaws
rstermer - I know that this is a router site but for what your wanting to do and the length of your lumber I am not so sure that you would not be better off using a table saw.
I think I'm constrained to use the router table. My table saw is a shopsmith, which has a very small table, which makes working with long stock awkward. I don't have a tenoning jig either. I suppose I could make one, but the boards are too long to stand up vertically without hitting the ceiling.

Thanks for your input.
Bob S
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Router is still my name
is something like this what you're trying to do?
I did these free hand, No router table needed.

http://www.routerforums.com/attachme...s-dcp_5253.jpg
Beautiful work! I hope one day to have the skill to do as well.
Bob S
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobj3
Hi Bob S.

Long boards can be a pain..that's why the floating tenons work so well for that job.
Like many woodworkes I have done it both way but with a tenon jig on the table saw you will still run into the error of long stock cutting the tenons on the table saw, you could do it outside but you have alot of mass that you will need to control...or just lay it flat on the table saw but again it's alot of mass to get cut just right on the button the shoulder cut is the hard part but you will still need to put in the pockets...so to say one easy jig will do the job easy..

You can make a quick jig and use the plunge router to do the job.
All you need to do is take some stock a put in a slot for the brass guide to run in.
3/4" wide slot works best and as long as you want it to be..then just clamp it to the end on the stock and plunge out the pockets on both parts with the same jig..
That way they both will line up right on...
Just clamp the long boards in the work bench vise then clamp on the jig..
To make your floating tentons just use the router table to round over all the edges so they slip right in...

.....

jig looks like the one below but out of wood without all the knobs and rods just a slot will do the job.
Thanks. I'll keep that in mind. I think that is something a low skill, untutored individual such as myself could do and be successful. If my original plan doesn't work, I'll just cut off the tenons and use the approach you outlined. I'll simply not cut the mortises in the mating piece until I see how the tenons work out, and if not successful, I'll know how to proceed.
Thanks again,
Bob S

Last edited by rstermer; 04-23-2008 at 07:44 PM.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 04-23-2008, 07:12 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kp91
You can use a surface planing bit, and the way you describe should be just fine. You should get a very good finish if you're just cleaning up the rough cut of the bandsaw.

You could also make the shoulder cuts on a table saw and then do the cheek cuts on the bandsaw.

That's going to be one sturdy rack!

http://magnate.net/index.cfm?event=s...roup&theID=136

Thanks for the confirmation, I'm off to Lowes to get a new bandsaw blade.
Regards,
Bob S
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