Looking for input on home built router table - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-28-2008, 11:20 PM Thread Starter
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Default Looking for input on home built router table

Hello all. I'm looking for input on a router table I'm planning on building. The table itself is from an L shaped desk, It's completely covered in black formica and is 1.25 inches thick of particle board. It's thick and heavy so I know it will be strong enough. I'm doing this because I see the limitations with the craftsman router table that I currently have, and any others designed similar to it. As of right now, I'm only concerned with the table top design.

The input I'm looking for from you router gods are as follows:

Would this be a good material for the table, and can it be accurately rabbeted/grooved for a router plate?


As far as the miter channel, what size(width and depth) is the most common for gadgets such as jigs, feather boards, miter gauges, etc......?

What do you all think is better? T channel or U channel? What is better and has more gadget(see above) options?

If I decide to build my own fence to go with it, but want it on two parallel tracks for better squaring, sliding, again, what's best T or U?

On the top of the fence, the T channel or U channel questions from before as it pertains to the fence.

Another idea I had for the fence is it's connetors on the side to make each side slide evenly such as on a table saw, or that highend Kreg fence design. Or, should I just buy a Kreg fence?

One other idea I've had that I think would be good on a router table is having a second miter channel parallel to the regular channel, similar to some table saws. What do you all think?
Also, I know that if I do this, I have to modify the channels to accomadate crossing the fence channels along with this.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-29-2008, 08:07 AM
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Here's what I did with mine.
http://www.routerforums.com/68956-post20.html
I used 3/4" mitre track and T-tracks.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 02:37 AM
 
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Another advantage of twin tracks for your fence is that you can micro advance the fence by using set stops behind the fence (Triton Router table is agood example).
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 05:33 AM
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A desk seems a good solution. Are you mounting your router on a plate? Why not clamp your fence to the table and build offset adjustment into the lleft hand split fence? Mount featherboards to a subbase and clamp that to the table. A smooth surface for the top, does not fill with dust.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 09:41 AM
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You might have to add some framing under the top, if using particle board. Otherwise, it should be OK. My table is similar to Mike's, posted above, but i just used a Ttrack instead of a miter track. The T tracks are used for featherboards on this table. If you look at the back of the fence you can see how I dealt with sliding the cheeks of the fence, there are slots cut to allow for that.
I have used both t track and the extruded U track and it seems like t track is easier to use. Most t track accomodates a wider selection and size of fastener in the track. The aluminum extruded U track is a more robust product and cheaper but I have only been able to use it in 10S size to accomodate a 1/4" flanged fastener. It will not accomodate a 5/16" fastener of any kind. If you use 15S size of U track, the track, itself, is over 1" wide and that leads to installation problems, IMO. The dual miter/t track sold at the woodworking suppliers seems to be a good product and would fit a lot of use in a router table. Good luck with your table design.
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Sawdust is not dirt

Last edited by westend; 07-24-2009 at 09:43 AM.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 09:45 AM
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Westend, where do you have your dust extraction port sited please?
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 09:53 AM
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In general particle board is a poor choice for a router table since it tends to sag over time. The best commercially built tables use baltic birch plywood covered with a high pressure laminate top and bottom. There is nothing wrong with installing a router into a desk top like you plan to do, it lowers your cost and gets you routing and that is the important thing. Because of planned use of products like an Incra jig aluminum tracks are very popular. Miter track is generally a U channel but you need T track to fasten most accessories with this method. This is one school of thought on the subject. The other is the way Bob and Rick Rosendahl teach: "Keep it simple" and you are more likely to use it. T tracks and U channel tie you to locations... limit your set up's to some degree. The Router Workshop way is to simply clamp accessories in place where needed. Since there is no fixed location to deal with you have more options on placement. Having tried both methods I am a convert to the Router Workshop style. There is no wrong way to go about this, use what ever you are most comfortable with. Do include dust collection which ever way you go. You will be healthier and spend less time on clean up.

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Last edited by Mike; 07-24-2009 at 09:55 AM.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 09:57 AM
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Mike, every fence plan I have seen uses a port in line with the opening in the fence. Every turn you make decreases efficiency of flow.

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 09:58 AM
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Thanks Westend, a picture is worh a thousand words.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-24-2009, 10:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Wingate View Post
Westend, where do you have your dust extraction port sited please?
Mike,
I have one 2 1/2" port on the back side of the fence, made to draw through the fence body and between the cheeks. I have another 4" port in the router motor cavity in the cabinet,handles almost 100% of the dust.

Sawdust is not dirt
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