Climb Cutting - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 10:41 AM Thread Starter
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Default Climb Cutting

I'm routing the circumference an elliptical piece and it's clear I'm having climb cutting issues. I wondered if someone could point me to a thread that discusses the "how-to's" of climb cutting with a table mounted router.

Thanks for reading.

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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 10:58 AM
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I'm routing the circumference an elliptical piece and it's clear I'm having climb cutting issues. I wondered if someone could point me to a thread that discusses the "how-to's" of climb cutting with a table mounted router.

Thanks for reading.
What is it you are cutting,do you HAVE to climb cut it? Is it free hand or on a table?

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 11:07 AM
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I'm not sure there is such a thing Berry but I occasionally do it at the corners of a piece where I'm likely to get tearout especially on tearout prone woods like red cedar. I'm not really sure how you mean that though. Are you routing a profile or cutting the shape out of a larger piece? Normally you should be starting from the right side of the table and feed the piece into the bit and then rotate it. Can you give more details?
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 12:59 PM
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It makes sense to climb when you can't use a backing to prevent tearout. I had to do it when rounding over the edges of the router bowl I posted recently in show and tell. The way to avoid the runaway cut problem is to take small climbing bites in the "normal" (i.e. non climb direction). See the picture.

Also, a spiral bit helps a lot. I think a shear would too but haven't tried it.

edit: fixed picture
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Last edited by PhilBa; 02-09-2016 at 01:13 PM.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 01:23 PM Thread Starter
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This is a small piece, the base/stand for a little scroll saw project for Valentine's Day. The view is showing the bottom of the stand.

The stock is cedar I was trying to cut a chamfer on the bottom of the stand and then I wanted to cut a profile on the top edge. The tear-out was lots worse before I sanded. And it kicked back quite a bit so I'm looking for help.

Thanks again.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 01:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berry View Post
I'm routing the circumference an elliptical piece and it's clear I'm having climb cutting issues. I wondered if someone could point me to a thread that discusses the "how-to's" of climb cutting with a table mounted router.

Thanks for reading.
see if these help...
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File Type: pdf CLIMB CUTTING.pdf (74.4 KB, 97 views)
File Type: pdf ROUTER FEED DIRECTION 3.pdf (119.3 KB, 80 views)
File Type: pdf ROUTER FEED DIRECTION 4.pdf (102.6 KB, 65 views)
File Type: pdf ROUTER FEED DIRECTION 5.pdf (54.6 KB, 75 views)
File Type: pdf ROUTER FEED DIRECTION 2.pdf (90.0 KB, 66 views)

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 01:44 PM
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Berry, you might want to take smaller bites in several passes as well. That looks like a fairly large cut.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-09-2016, 05:46 PM
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Berry what is happening is you are cutting against the grain, and the bit is digging in. I have found that the only way I can do that is to do as Phil says and do small increments of height on your cuts.

I run into this on my lock shackles and have overcome it by raising the bit 1/32" at a pass. It takes longer but works without grabbing a chunk out or throwing the piece across the room,or worse yet ruining the piece.

Herb
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-10-2016, 09:50 AM
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In these sort of situations I identify the areas which are going to give trouble, and do a series of controlled shallow climb cuts, on these areas only, till the bearing makes contact. The rest is routed in the normal direction.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-10-2016, 11:31 AM
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In these sort of situations I identify the areas which are going to give trouble, and do a series of controlled shallow climb cuts, on these areas only, till the bearing makes contact. The rest is routed in the normal direction.
I agree with this. On several occasions I have to hand work these spots with a file and hard sanding block, only takes a moment and comes out as good as the rest of the cuts.

Sometimes power tools do not work for everything and I have to resort to doing some hand work, But I guess thats the fate of a woodworker.

Herb
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