How to double up a Melamine White Panel - Router Forums
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 03-18-2016, 12:27 AM Thread Starter
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Default How to double up a Melamine White Panel

I am going to build a router table top using melamine white panel and want to double up the panel for a 1 1/2 inch table for added strength. Besides the obvious of screwing them together, is there any thing else you would recommend?

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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 03-18-2016, 12:38 AM
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rough (coarse sand paper) up the mating surface and contact cement them together...
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 03-18-2016, 02:15 AM
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I made mine that way.
used one sheet of 18mm and one sheet of 9mm.
Put the big sheet on top, scored the entire mating surfaces of both, and glued.
Clamped them together, and then screwed from the bottom into the top every 30cm (12") in each direction.
I left it overnight for the glue to set real good.

But it pays to make sure the top sheet surface is totally flat before you start, its not guaranteed that it will be, and if there are any waves in it, youll struggle to get good cuts on short pieces of wood.
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 03-18-2016, 08:22 AM
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Lightbulb How Norm does it

Does it have to be 2 sheets of melamine? Just for the sake of seeing what other people have done, you might want to take a look at what Norm does. Note how he carefully plots out where the cutouts and dados will be and avoids putting screws anywhere near them. If you keep all of the screw on the underside, you can always check exactly where they are if you need to make additional cuts later.

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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 03-18-2016, 11:57 AM
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I backed my panel with a sheet of MDF using contact cement. I subsequently screwed a support frame to the glue up. Flatness does count
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 03-18-2016, 12:24 PM
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I made a table out of one thickness and even cut 3/8" deep channels in it for track but I mounted it on a good level frame and had frame members under the track grooves. I used biscuits to attach the top to the frame. Still dead level after 5 or 6 years and it goes from +35C to -45C in a metal shed in Northern Alberta. You don't have to have 2 thicknesses and if you do they don't need to be glued together.

If you still decide to join them together then I would have the bottom sheet attached to the frame already and absolutely, perfectly flat because if it isn't when you join the second sheet to the first you will never be able to get them flat after.
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