A few router table questions. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-26-2005, 08:53 AM Thread Starter
 
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Default A few router table questions.

Well I finally got my Bosch 1617evs. Thanks eeryone for the input on that choice. Well now it's time to build my table. I have a few peices of 3/4" MDF and a sheet of 1/4" hardboard laying around the shop. I plan on building the top out of the MDF and put a sheet of hardboard over the top. My first question is what is the best adhesive (yellow wood glue, all purpose cement glue, ETC) to use between the hardboard and MDF. Second question is, do I need to rough up the face of the MDF before appying the glue? Bare with me, I have one more question, LOL. I am not planning on getting an insert yet, I am just going to use the table top to mount the router to. My third and final question, does it matter if I mount the router flat against the bottom of the table or should I route out an indention to mount the router in?

Thanks in advance.

By the way, Bob and Rick, I finally found a PBS station on Dish network that played your show. I love the show.
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-26-2005, 09:52 AM
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You will be very disappointed with the router mouned as described. How will you change bits ?,Adjust depth of cut ?. Removing the longer machine screws each time will get old in a hurry. Do your self a favor and rethink this.

Good Luck
Jerry
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-26-2005, 11:19 AM
 
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Welcome. The type of glue to use for this is given more importance than it should have. Elmers yellow glue & Titebond will work just fine. Put a thin layer over the complete surface of one piece paying particular attention to the edges. Any squeeze out can be wiped off wirh a DAMP not wet cloth. You can clamp the pieces together or set heavy weights over the whole surface. Watch out for slippage between the pieces. Clamping the edges often pulls or pushes the two layers out of line. Hardboard (tempered) has a hard slick side and a rough side. If you want to use this material put the glue on the rough side. I've cut hardboard with a good blade and the edges are smooth but I've never tried to rout it. A much better surface would be high pressure laminate on both sides of the table. Don't try mounting your router directly to the bottom of your table. Some on line companies will sell you a plate and predrill it to fit your router. Some will even sell a template for routing out the opening for the plate. Look at Hartville, Woodcraft and Rockler just to name a few. Good luck with your project,
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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-26-2005, 01:43 PM
 
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I have to agree with the others here, don't try the method you are thinking about, been there done that, and for all the reasons JM mentions it just plain sucks!

Why take the time and effort to pick a good router, and then stick it in a substandard table?

If you need, really NEED to just get one thing done in a router table (I've been there too) just cut a hole and mount the router in a 3' x 2' piece of plywood, even half inch will do, get a really straight 2x4 or an off cut of 3/4" plywood and clamp it to the "table". Support the table between two saw horses, or in a workmate like fixture. I've done this on site, and it works, well actually, for basic routing.

I would not spend the time and effort doing what you are talking about, but that is just me, I'd rather spend the time and do it right, once.

My granddad always used to say
Quote:
Why is there enough time to do it right the second time? Why not just do it right the first time and be done with it?
Also as someone mentioned, you have to seal both sides of they plywood base, if you put the hardboard on one side, it will warp in time, as the hardboard seals that side of the plywood, the un-hardboard side will absorb moisture faster, and this will warp the plywood.

Good luck, I'm not trying to be negative or discouraging, but trying to save you time by sharing my experiences, as in I've done what you are thinking about doing, and while it does work, it does barely work, and like they said, it gets old quick.

Cheers!
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-26-2005, 09:41 PM
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Archer, I built the Woodsmith router table for my 1617. To fast track the ideas they go as follows. Build your table from 3/4" plywood topped with two 1/4" layers of Masonite.(Hardboard) Use 1 x 2" hardwood for edge banding. Cover both sides with Formica. This gives you a very strong, very stable, vibration dampening top. You can use any white or yellow glue for attaching the plywood to the Masonite, and the second layer of Masonite to the first layer. Also for applying the edge banding. I use Titebond III since it is the fastest setting, longest work time, and stronger than polyurethane in a wood to wood bond for all my projects. The Formica requires a good contact cement like Weldwood. Do yourself a huge favor: bite the bullet and buy yourself a Rousseau mounting plate like Stu and I have. You can buy a template for installing it in a matter of minutes, or follow the instructions with some wood and clamps. I bought the template and am sure glad I did, I have installed 4 of these plates so far. Drop me a note if you are interested in the plans for this table.

Mike
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-26-2005, 10:44 PM
 
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I agree on the Rousseau plate, and the template to install it, would have saved me hours of time, but the place I bought the plate from did not have the template, and I did not know it existed. Others, like the sponsor here sell plates as well (don't they?) but I have not used them, so I cannot recommend them, good or bad (I just do not know).

I've heard some complaints about the Rousseau plate having a slight upwards curve to it, I guess it does, but it is very, VERY small, and I've found that with the M12 hanging on it, it is near dead flat. Oh, and a little something I learned about that, install the router on the plate, then put the plate in the table, so the router is hanging from the plate (like it would in use) if you find the plate is a little too proud for your liking, lossen the four screws holding the router to the plate, and then push every so slightly, and tighten the screws, this gives me a dead flat plate.

You use new longer screws, as the stock ones are way too short.

Cheers!

Last edited by Stu in Tokyo Japan; 02-27-2005 at 05:40 AM.
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-28-2005, 11:05 AM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone for the advice. I will go ahead and buy the plate and laminate both sides. As far as plates go, I thought about either the Rousseau or Rocklers plate. iIn everyone opinion, which is better the Rousseau or Rocklers Aluminum plate, there is a pretty big price difference between them

STU, I saw your other post about the table you built. Very nice job, I might have build me one, LOL
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 02-28-2005, 12:40 PM
 
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Archer, I have only experience with the Rousseau plate, I'm in Japan, and I do buy stuff from Rockler.com (one of the few companies that will ship outside of the US), I've nothing to say about the Rockler plates from my own use.

I think they are good, they look good, the idea of a thick aluminum plate sounds good, but the Rousseau is thick as well, and the amout of flex in it is very little. When you consider you are not pushing on a single point on the plate when in use, I think the Rousseau is good.

Somewhere else on this forum someone says they bought the plastic off of Ebay for cheap and made their own plate, I imagine you could do the same thing with an aluminum plate as well.

Good luck, PS don't use past tense when talking about my router table, I'm STILL building it
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-01-2005, 08:39 AM
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Archer, the standard Rockler plate runs about $5 more than the Rousseau. Both have the ability to change the inner opening size for larger bits but they do it in different ways. With the Rockler plate you change the center to an (optional, extra cost) different piece. With the Rousseau you remove the gray or gray and red sections to get the proper size. I prefer the onboard storage idea. The standard Rockler plate is much smaller than the Rousseau which lists for $44.95 at Woodcraft. The larger Rockler plate which is 1" wider than the Rousseau and the same length is $69.95 list. All have templates available for installation at additional cost. The Rousseau plate will mount PC style guide bushings as is. Rocklers plate requires an optional, extra cost insert to do this. For extreme precision work Rousseau has a set of zero clearance inserts made from machined brass in typical bit sizes, they mount the same as guide bushings with a nut. Replacement inserts for the Rousseau plate come with a guide pin for $9.99 list. The Rousseau plate has "Corner snuggers", small mounting clips you adjust as the table wears in to keep the mounting plate secure; the plate also has small holes you can thread to accept allen screws for precision leveling. Lower cost, better features... to my way of thinking it is no contest.

Mike
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Last edited by Mike; 03-01-2005 at 08:41 AM.
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-01-2005, 04:15 PM Thread Starter
 
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Mike, thanks for the comparison. looks like I will go ahead and get the Rousseau plate. I was wondering if the the plate comes with all the leveling hardware and etc. So the only thing I have to do is cut the hole, mount the leveling hardware, drill the mounting holes in the plate, and thats it right?


Stu:Sorry I thought you were through with the router table. Anyway, it looks dang nice. I really like the fence design.
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