Need advice about raised panel routing - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2016, 08:10 PM Thread Starter
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Question Need advice about raised panel routing

As a relatively new and inexperienced router user, I experience new adventures daily. Maybe you can help with the latest:
I am using a new Bosch 1617 router mounted on a Bosch RA1171 table. I started using straight and rabbeting bits and it went well, until the latest...
I decided to built some cabinet doors with raised panels. The huge diameter (3.5") cutters concerned me, so I decided on a smaller Freud 2.75" Quadra-cut bit, with no back cutter, following many recommendations. I installed the bit into the router (with the 1/2" collet) and examined it spinning. No wobbling or uneven spin could be detected with the naked eye.
For my first shot, I used a 3/4" poplar board and set the fence so the first pass was limited to just 1/2". Using 2 featherboards, and a pushstick and the board secured against the fence, I carefully pushed forward.
Then the problems started: it made a weird noise and wood chips started flying. When the whole table began vibrating, I turned it off immediately. The partly routed raised panel was not straight, but wavy. Chips had been torn in a few places.
What could be the cause? (I am working by the book, after watching many youtube clips).
Then I thought maybe there is a problem with the aluminum plate insert. I was not sure it is leveled perfectly (very annoying process) and when I checked with my ruler some light is passing, indicating sagging in the middle. It is not severe but still noticeable. I also feel a small bump when the wood passes from the MDF table, to the aluminum plate. Could these cause my problem?
I reinstalled the bit in the collet at a different level, and tried again with another board. The results however, were similar.
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2016, 08:39 PM
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Shank at least 1" into collet and tightened to >15 inch-pounds.
If the plate and surrounding table top substrate are not in the same plane, you'll trap the bit vertically, (momentarily). That will aggravate an out of balance cutter.
Run this cutter at 12k or maybe slower if you must.

Bottom line: Spin the cutter at minimum speed, is it vibrating?
If yes, then maybe a bad cutter.
Moreover, that motor has not the fly-wheel for a cutter of that size.
For me, a cutter of that diameter, has no business in any router.
Damn glad you did not pull back a stub.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2016, 08:59 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, I ran the router motor with the bit inserted but it doesn't wobble. However, with this size and shape it is difficult to say if it's precisely straight.
And yes, I used a low speed.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2016, 11:20 PM
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Your router has plenty of power to run the bit you are using. I would probably take 4 passes to get good cuts without scaring the hell out of you and minimize tearout. You never mention router speed, you need to slow this bit way down, probably 10,000 or so.
All that said, I have a bigger table and a bigger router and I use vertical bits. Actually cheaper and IMO much safer.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-03-2016, 12:30 AM
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You can reduce the amount of wood that the cutter has to remove by running the panel on edge past a beveled table saw blade. This might help. Although you are taking a small cut it might still be too much for that combination.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-03-2016, 12:56 AM Thread Starter
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Just to be clear, I used router speed setting #2, which I think translates to about 11-12,000 rpm. I also ran it faster away of the table just to see if I can detect any suspicious motion. There was nothing I could see, but I don't know how to test that the bit is inserted and spins straight.

However, that small depression in the insert plate made me think that maybe the board wasn't well pushed against the bottom and when using the push stick it moved up - down by about 1-2 mm. Could that cause uneven routing?
Anyway, is there a better after market insert plate that fits in?
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-03-2016, 01:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oberon_1 View Post
Just to be clear, I used router speed setting #2, which I think translates to about 11-12,000 rpm. I also ran it faster away of the table just to see if I can detect any suspicious motion. There was nothing I could see, but I don't know how to test that the bit is inserted and spins straight.

However, that small depression in the insert plate made me think that maybe the board wasn't well pushed against the bottom and when using the push stick it moved up - down by about 1-2 mm. Could that cause uneven routing?
Anyway, is there a better after market insert plate that fits in?
yes it will...
use feather boards to hold the piece steady and firmly to the bit.....
Attached Files
File Type: pdf RouterBitBasics_en.pdf (1.78 MB, 53 views)
File Type: pdf ROUTER SAFETY 2.pdf (34.4 KB, 52 views)
File Type: pdf ROUTER SAFETY 1.pdf (73.3 KB, 44 views)
File Type: pdf R5 101807_bonusdownload.pdf (1.57 MB, 59 views)
File Type: pdf Collet_Maintenance.pdf (86.2 KB, 43 views)

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-03-2016, 06:55 AM
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You should be able to level your router plate so there is no "catch" as the piece moves from mdf to plate. It takes some time and effort with most tables to level a plate. I have a woodpecker plate in a Rockler table and had to increase the depth of the rabbited opening to accommodate the extra thickness of that plate vs the old Rockler plate. On my table there are eight leveling screws and you have to reach them from under the table, which is pretty awkward. Find your table's instruction book for info on leveling the plate. If the workpiece hangs up on the table, that is a sign you need to make sure it is flat and level. Most aluminum plates are pretty flat to start with, but some of the plastic plates are iffy.

You might also inspect the cutters and the body of the bit to see if there are any chip outs or other imperfections. Finally, the grain direction is pretty important and I think one of Stick's pdfs covers that.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-03-2016, 02:20 PM
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Default Raised Panel Router Bit

I think your concerns have been addressed quite well by very experienced members. I have recently started using a vertical raised panel router bit. It works really well for the projects I have done to date. (machinist's tool box and a cpl of smaller boxes). It is safe and quite inexpensive. You adjust your depth and such by moving the fence as well as raising or lowering the bit. As you can see, the bit has a smaller diameter, so far less chance of vibration problems. your work piece is vertical against the fence for all cuts. This seems safer to me. Hope this is a help for your needs.
Vertical Raised Panel Bit, 1/2'' Shank | Elite Tools

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-03-2016, 05:54 PM Thread Starter
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Great answers folks! I will try the vertical bit as advised.
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