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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good evening.
I'm seeking out a set to make a paneled barn door.
So far, I've seen a Freud set and a cheap set on eBay.

Are there any other sets that y'all might know of?

I'm envisioning a 4 or 6 panel door that is 38"x 84" so my wife can slide the laundry door shut instead of swinging our current 36" door.

I tried to search the forum, but everything I found was 10+ years old.

Thanks!
 

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You could go to Whiteside's website and see what they have. They are a high quality maker of bits. If it's a one and done deal you might consider checking MCLS as well.
 

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Take a look at the Whiteside cutters sold by Infinity Tools.

For a sliding door, I'm guessing that you'd want to keep the door fairly light - why not make the door with loose-tenons joints at the rail and stile connections, 1/4" plywood for the panels and trim molding at the joint between the rail/stile and the panel? This would eliminate the need for the expensive rail & stile cutter set, you probably already have what you need to cut the mortises - i.e. a 1/2" up-spiral bit.

Here's a link to the video showing Norm building an exterior door using loose tenons for the rail/stile joints
As this won't be an exterior door, there would be no concerns about protection from the weather so the construction could be pretty straightforward with through dadoes for the panel in the rails and stopped dadoes in the stiles. After assembling the door, add trim molding around the inside of the panels.
 

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My door sets came from Sommerfeld. Be sure you get a matched set, which means the shanks are all exactly the same length. Freud door sets are also matched.

For setup, a couple of points with a matched sets so you don't have to fiddle with getting them set up right. With matched sets you set up the first bit and all the rest align. However, you must but a grommet down into the collet so all your shanks all start at the same depth.

Sommerfeld makes a very interesting jig (about $30, shaped a little like a star, that allows you to set bit height for specific bits, and accounts for different thicknesses of working stock. Very handy and will save a lot of setup time. Pix below. Sommerfeld tools. The Yellow one is for Sommerfeld bits, the red one is for Freud sets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm a huge Sommerfeld fan, and I looked on his site, but must have missed the set he has for doors.
I love my yellow easy set, so this gives me another use for it.

I'll also check out Whiteside and MLCS.

Thanks for the tips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Take a look at the Whiteside cutters sold by Infinity Tools.

For a sliding door, I'm guessing that you'd want to keep the door fairly light - why not make the door with loose-tenons joints at the rail and stile connections, 1/4" plywood for the panels and trim molding at the joint between the rail/stile and the panel? This would eliminate the need for the expensive rail & stile cutter set, you probably already have what you need to cut the mortises - i.e. a 1/2" up-spiral bit.

Here's a link to the video showing Norm building an exterior door using loose tenons for the rail/stile joints https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dPVGoLwL8A As this won't be an exterior door, there would be no concerns about protection from the weather so the construction could be pretty straightforward with through dadoes for the panel in the rails and stopped dadoes in the stiles. After assembling the door, add trim molding around the inside of the panels.
Every time I see Norm build something, I am amazed at his skill set. Truly, he's an amazing craftsman. I only wish I could be a fraction as good as he.
 
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