Router Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am attempting to build some XMas presents and am attempting to do some inlay. I bought a couple of 1/8 spiral bits and have been working with Maple trying to cut a simple little 1/8 by 1/8 groove. I have broken two bits so far. I have gone slow and tried to be gentle. What am I doing wrong?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
I've broken I think 3 bits in the last couple of years. One was a 1/2" stg bit I dropped and TWO 1/8" spiral bits. Both times I think I was trying to take to deep a cut, in both cases it started to vibrate but before I could do anything else they broke. Each time I went back and finished the project using a new bit and lighter cut.

If anyone else has any ideas please let us know, I think I payed about $14 each for those.......

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I suspect either too fast a cut or too deep a cut, or a combination of both. I use an 1/8" solid carbide spiral bit to cut splines out of caning every few days. Too fast or too deep and they break off every time. The last one I've been using for over a year without any breakage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
hcbph said:
I suspect either too fast a cut or too deep a cut, or a combination of both. I use an 1/8" solid carbide spiral bit to cut splines out of caning every few days. Too fast or too deep and they break off every time. The last one I've been using for over a year without any breakage.
I have a chair that needs caning (up in the attic for about 5 years now) but I never thought about using a router to get the old spline out. Would you mind posting a few details like how you hold the router in location and so on?

Also would you mind tell us who makes the bit(s) you use? If you would rather not say that is OK too.

Thanks for the responce,

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
dustmaster said:
I am attempting to build some XMas presents and am attempting to do some inlay. I bought a couple of 1/8 spiral bits and have been working with Maple trying to cut a simple little 1/8 by 1/8 groove. I have broken two bits so far. I have gone slow and tried to be gentle. What am I doing wrong?
I would try taking cuts no more than 1/16th of an inch deep or so, to get down to the 1/8th depth you need. All bits are not created equal, cheaper bits just don't hold up what make bits are you buying?
Hope this helps, Woodnut65 :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Ed

First off, if the spline comes out without effort, that's the best way. Otherwise you want to cut through the old spline so you can get it out with a minimum of damage to the piece of furniture.

I use a cutout tool like this
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?function=Search
Get a 1/8" spiral carbide bit (I like using the 1/8" shank bits). I've gotten them through Grizzly, no complaints there.
First take an exacto knife to cut along both sides of the spline to seperate it from the wooden frame.
I start off with the bit set about 1/8"-3/16" exposure. Start in one corner and carefully control the tool as it has a tendency to pull if you're not careful. Once you're gotten it around, use a chisel and peel some of the spline out. Lower the bit and go around again, cutting deeper till you cut through the old spline. Once it's cut through, if it comes out easy, so much the better. If it doesn't pour a little white vinegar into the slot you've cut and let it soak a while. It will loosen up the old glue. Take an exacto knife and cut an X from corner to corner through the old cane. Peel the old cane back and it will usually come out fairly easy.

I use a sharp chisel, a commercial spline removing tool and another one I made specifically for the work I do. I have used this in redoing probably 200+ cane panels over the last few years and as the saying goes: "It works for me".

You need to use care with the cutout tool. It wants to pull to the side if you're not careful. Working counter clockwise is best, if you slip, it
cuts to the inside of the spline groove. I brace it carefully with one finger hooked over the edge of the piece. You have to determine your own speed, too slow and it can burn (as in smoldering) and too fast or deep and you break the bit.

Then it's a matter of putting in the new cane, staining and sealing it and you're done, but that's another story.

By the way, is you need guidance in how to install the new cane, shoot me an email.

Pauol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The first one was a Freud bit, the second one was a cheaper one. The Freud one did last longer, unfortunately, it's hard to get to the shop that carries those to replace it as I usually seem to break them on a Sunday :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I just noticed that shortcut I posted was no good. Try http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=42831

Any cutout type tool with a solid, adjustable base and preferably with both a 1/8" and 1/4" collet is good. The smaller the base, the closer it can get to other pieces ( eg. caning a back on a chair that is close to the seat rail).

You can use a laminate or other router, you just can't get in a s close to those restricted area around rails or arms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
hcbph said:
I just noticed that shortcut I posted was no good. Try http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=42831

Any cutout type tool with a solid, adjustable base and preferably with both a 1/8" and 1/4" collet is good. The smaller the base, the closer it can get to other pieces ( eg. caning a back on a chair that is close to the seat rail).

You can use a laminate or other router, you just can't get in a s close to those restricted area around rails or arms.
So if I read all this correctly, if I'm lucky the process will be very easy and at worst I have a major job ahead. I have a rotozip (actually two of them) so they would work better then the laminate router which I also have?

I will print up these measages and then when I feel up to it I'll get the chair down and see if I get lucky or not.

By the way do you disassemble the chair to get at the seat? And if the seat and back are the same age should I also replace the seat back while I'm at it?

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
dustmaster said:
The first one was a Freud bit, the second one was a cheaper one. The Freud one did last longer, unfortunately, it's hard to get to the shop that carries those to replace it as I usually seem to break them on a Sunday :p
I have never tried the Freud bits but in this case I guess lasting a bit longer is not much of a selling point. I know what you mean about things happen on Sundays, maybe that is not a good day to be routing on?

Well I hope some of the advice given above helps out and the both of us stop breaking 1/8" bits. Let us know how it goes OK?

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Ed

If this chair has been in an attic for years, any panels are probably dry and brittle. Better to do them all now rather than one and have another fail later.
I like using a cutout tool for the smaller base. It's able to get closer to other frame members. Unless I have to repair/reglue a piece of furniture beyond the caning, I normally don't disassemble other than removing uphoulstered seats.

I'm assuming you know how to prep the spline and cane, put it in and how to keep it in while it dries and shrinks. Again, if you don't do it right, it can pull itself out of the groove while it dries. Not intending to scare anyone off, as it's not difficult, long as you go through the right steps here.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
reible said:
maybe that is not a good day to be routing on?

Well I hope some of the advice given above helps out and the both of us stop breaking 1/8" bits. Let us know how it goes OK?

Ed
Too many toys, not enough time :-( Only day I have is Sunday

I finished making the grooves today after getting a replacement bit. I went really slow and also ensured the bit was down as far as possible in the collet without actually touching the bottom. Because the bit is so small, some of the cutting edge was lost down the collet. For some reason this looked wrong to me and I had pulled the bit up higher out of the collet. After looking it over I thought this might have had something to do with the bits breaking.

Thanks everyone for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
hcbph said:
Ed

If this chair has been in an attic for years, any panels are probably dry and brittle. Better to do them all now rather than one and have another fail later.
I like using a cutout tool for the smaller base. It's able to get closer to other frame members. Unless I have to repair/reglue a piece of furniture beyond the caning, I normally don't disassemble other than removing uphoulstered seats.

I'm assuming you know how to prep the spline and cane, put it in and how to keep it in while it dries and shrinks. Again, if you don't do it right, it can pull itself out of the groove while it dries. Not intending to scare anyone off, as it's not difficult, long as you go through the right steps here.

Paul
OK, I know nothing about how to do the job except I have a good idea how to get the old out from your posting. I was looking at a catalog today and saw a pattern that looks much like I remember the existing one has and I saw they sell a chisel for removing the old spine and of course they have new spline. It looks like I have to get the chair down to see the size of the spline groove to know what to buy.

If you have the time I'd love to hear your caner's instructions. I'm sure it will save me from having to waste too much time and supplies on a "messed up job". I'd love to have the chair to set in again.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I just put together a quick doc on how I cane a panel in a chair. It's just under 7 mb in zipped format. PM me with an email address if you want a copy and I'll send it out in a few days to anyone that wants a copy. It's mostly pictures with brief desciption on how to do it. It's not the only way to cane but it's the way I've done it for many years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
For small cutters I have always use a few milling machine cutters I used to use when working in a toolroom.
We used to mill 5% chrome steel for which a 3 flute cutter was best.
Something I havent seen for some years is an FC3 cutter which were harder than normal HSS cutters so lasted longer and were then thrown away instead of regrinding.
These FC3 cutters were only made in small diameters with the largest being 1/4".
HSS milling cutters hold their edge well and I have been using the cutters in my toolbox for a few years in my router.
When they get blunt I wont hesitate in going to a milling cutter maker and buying some more.
Swarf clearance and finish is far better with an HSS cutter than any TC router cutter.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top