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After searching on here, I haven't found exactly the info I'm looking for. I have upgraded from my DeWalt 12" miter saw to a DeWalt 12" sliding miter saw. I want to buy another finer blade than the supplied 32 tooth. After considering both price and application, I'm kind of leaning to the Freud Diablo D12100X @ $55 on Amazon. The DeWalt blades are pricey, and their cheaper ones are made in China. Please, I need some guidance from the pros. Thanks. F
 

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Have you considered Freud's LUM82 or LUM84 (combination)...? Both are good for RAS's and SCMS's...

100 teeth seems a bit high for cross cutting...
 

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so much for the search function...

type of blade, it's purpose matter a great deal...
the blade(s) need to fit the application....
these PDF's cover this pretty well...

FWIW...
I'm very partial to Freud...

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
so much for the search function...

type of blade, it's purpose matter a great deal...
the blade(s) need to fit the application....
these PDF's cover this pretty well...

FWIW...
I'm very partial to Freud...

.
I do quite a bit of projects that would benefit from super smooth cuts. Mostly on smaller pieces like picture frames etc. For larger less particular cuts, the 32 tooth has been adequate. Thanks for the reading Stick. F
 

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yur welcome..
 

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I had a chance to talk to a Freud factory rep a year or so ago. I asked him what the difference is between the Diablo line (basically the DIY grade of blade) and their commercial blades in the same configurations (hook, grind, # of teeth) and his reply was nothing really except that all quality blades have thicker carbide so that they can be sharpened more times (6 as opposed to 3 I think). So before you shell out the extra money for a commercial quality blade check into local sharpening services to see how reliable they are and whether they will be cost effective. They usually charge by the tooth so a 100 tooth count may make sharpening cost prohibitive in which case it will make no sense to spend more initially.

Most SCMS blades are thin kerf because they require less torque to start which is easier on the motors. But the thin kerf affects cut quality, particularly on miter cuts where the blade literally bounces off the grain divisions where it passes from softer spring wood to harder fall wood and back. Sometimes cut quality can be greatly improved by adding a blade stiffener.
 

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Stick and I have debated saw blades endlessly. So, I'll not give my opinion of Freud.
On my Bosch Slider I've found the full thickness Tenryu Miter Pro 60 and 80 tooth to give the smoothest finish cuts. With any brand, a thin kerf blade, especially a 12", will deflect on an angle cut.
 

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Just to muddy the waters a bit, would one and all recommend the same blade for a “chop” style and a “slider”? That assumes of course that the intended use is the same, i.e., a finished crosscut in hard woods.
 

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Fought deflection, dumped my 12 inch DeWalt miter saw over it. Just using full kerf blades on my 10 inch Bosch sliding, compound miter saw and table saw these days. Freud blades work great for me, up to 80 teeth for crosscuts, but what sits on the saw all the time is Freud's glue line blade. Wonderful blade.
 

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Tom

I use the glue line in my TS and love it. I only use my Dewalt chop saw for proximal cuts, all finals are done on the TS. No room for a slider.
 

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Stick and I have debated saw blades endlessly. So, I'll not give my opinion of Freud.
On my Bosch Slider I've found the full thickness Tenryu Miter Pro 60 and 80 tooth to give the smoothest finish cuts. With any brand, a thin kerf blade, especially a 12", will deflect on an angle cut.
agreed, a TK blade can leave a lot to be desired... especially in 12''...
 

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Just to muddy the waters a bit, would one and all recommend the same blade for a “chop” style and a “slider”? That assumes of course that the intended use is the same, i.e., a finished crosscut in hard woods.
you could but I wouldn't..
 

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Just to muddy the waters a bit, would one and all recommend the same blade for a “chop” style and a “slider”? That assumes of course that the intended use is the same, i.e., a finished crosscut in hard woods.

Jon, I would think a slider (or RAS) would want something closer to a negative hook angle to minimize climbing...not so much a requirement for a chopper...
 

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Jon, I would think a slider (or RAS) would want something closer to a negative hook angle to minimize climbing...not so much a requirement for a chopper...
agreed...
 

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Just to muddy the waters a bit, would one and all recommend the same blade for a “chop” style and a “slider”? That assumes of course that the intended use is the same, i.e., a finished crosscut in hard woods.
I see Stick said no but I would say yes. You'd still want a low angle or negative hook. Much positive hook and you risk the blade grabbing your wood and lifting it and getting jammed against the frame. Plus positive hook is bad for splintering. If you look at the geometry of melamine blades for example they are usually negative hook for that reason. The negative hook tends to push the board down is use on a chop or slider but tends to want to lift a little on a TS but I haven't found it enough to be a problem.
 

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Thank you one and all for your considered opinions. Very helpful as I need o replace the blade in my Dewalt chopper.
 

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I have the non slider 12'' DeWalt and I upgraded to a Diablo with last year's Christmas present from my wife, a gift card for the Big Orange. I bought the 12'' 100 teeth thin curf Ultimate Finish. I only use it for my fine woodworking projects. This summer I built a fence and removed this blade and used the DeWalt that came with the saw. The thin curf gives such a smooth edge that NO SANDING is required ! I enjoy using it and I have always been a big fan of Freud products. You get what you pay for.
 
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I think the tooth geometry is fairly critical for cut quality. Almost any cutoff blade will do a good job on a 90* cut but it's the 45s that can be a problem. I bought a Delta branded one years ago for a straight 10" chop to do a picture frame in oak and it was doing a horrible job despite being labeled as specifically for a chop saw. Whe I looked carefully at the cut I could that the blade was wobbling back and forth as it cut. A heavy blade stabilizer fixed the problem. But I think a good chop or slider blade should have a grind where the sides of the teeth are ground to plane the sides of the cut. I think that type grind would be less prone to wander.
 
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