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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's an interesting tool. It's a rather single purpose tool called the 18 Volt bandsaw. Essentially an it's alternative for using a jig saw or a miter box and a hack saw.

There must be demand amongst plumbers and electricians for cordless bandsaws. I'll admit, I'm left scratching my head. Unless your putting new pipes a new house or doing a whole house is seems to a limited use tool.

Regardless, the 18 Volt band saw looks like a one trick pony for people addicted to toys.

What do you think? Is this Portable bandsaw another fad gadget or does it have a place in anyone's tool box?

 

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Theo
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My thoughts on cordless tools are that they are only of real use to people working on job sites with no power. If they are used in shops with electrical power, then they are basically just expensive toys.

I think I have five drills in my shop, all corded. I bought just one, a small B&D in probably 1976. The rest were all used when I was given them, and all of them still work. I plug them in, pull the trigger, I drill a hole; no charging batteries, no buying replacement batteries, no expensive initial cost, and no buying another when the battery goes bad and you find out they no longer make those particular batteries. So, unless I get a job working on new homes or some such, I'll just stick with my dependable, and less expensive, corded tools.
 

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Doug
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I'll stick with the Milwaukee Porta-band corded bandsaw. There's very few saws that can compare to it when fabricating thing out of angle iron or flat bar.

If you want, you can pimp it out like Jimmy Diresta did, but it works great as is. I have held it in a vise to use it as a stationary saw, but it really isn't supposed to be used that way...

 

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Theo
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I'll stick with the Milwaukee Porta-band corded bandsaw. There's very few saws that can compare to it when fabricating thing out of angle iron or flat bar.

If you want, you can pimp it out like Jimmy Diresta did, but it works great as is. I have held it in a vise to use it as a stationary saw, but it really isn't supposed to be used that way...
That just reminded me, I have a portable bandaw, bought new even. Got it several years ago. And it was from HF. And it works just fine. I don't use it free-hand tho, made a stand that it lives in. Think I have a picture or two of the stand too. Oooo, I do, I do. But don't bother asking me how I made it, because I have no clue, it was one of those Zen woodworking things.
 

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I'll stick with the Milwaukee Porta-band corded bandsaw. There's very few saws that can compare to it when fabricating thing out of angle iron or flat bar.

If you want, you can pimp it out like Jimmy Diresta did, but it works great as is. I have held it in a vise to use it as a stationary saw, but it really isn't supposed to be used that way...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kf8So17o8oU
I enjoyed the video, forgot my glasses though and flash burned my eyes

I agree that in the shop a corded saw would be the way to go, but up on a lift or hanging off a rebar column it might prove useful to have a battery saw. Also might come in handy to cut a lock off a gate out in the boonies, but I wouldn't do that.
Herb
 

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My thoughts on cordless tools are that they are only of real use to people working on job sites with no power. If they are used in shops with electrical power, then they are basically just expensive toys.

I think I have five drills in my shop, all corded. I bought just one, a small B&D in probably 1976. The rest were all used when I was given them, and all of them still work. I plug them in, pull the trigger, I drill a hole; no charging batteries, no buying replacement batteries, no expensive initial cost, and no buying another when the battery goes bad and you find out they no longer make those particular batteries. So, unless I get a job working on new homes or some such, I'll just stick with my dependable, and less expensive, corded tools.

I couldn't disagree more. I work in a shop, I do this for a living and I do it for a hobby. I am basically speechless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I couldn't disagree more. I work in a shop, I do this for a living and I do it for a hobby. I am basically speechless.
I love the cordless tools I do have in my arsenal. My Millwakee Fuel Drill performs as well as any corded drill.

I’d love to have a cordless Brad nailer like the Ryobi One. A lot of times you’re working off a ladder with the nailer. Cordless is the way to go for added safety.

I’d love to buy the Milwaukee cordless Sawzall reciprocating saw for demolition work. The cord can get tangled up in debris. I also use reciprocating saws for tree trimming. Getting rid of the cord makes the job a lot easier.

There’s a lot of jobs I would never use a cordless tool for but there’s several jobs where they can make work easier, quicker and safer, especially when working off of tall ladder and in tight spaces.
 

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I have a fairly small shop space that is packed with tools and such. Messing with cords is always annoying and awkward, so I really prefer cordless tools when possible. I have DeWalt 18v tools. Their saws all is great yard trimming as well. My yard would require 200 plus feet of 12 gauge extension cords to use conventional power tools. DC motors have a lot of torque, so while the charge lasts, power is sufficient to cut almost anything I want to remove. Had a bunch of Cottonwood trees (terrible things, hard to kill) and had to build a shed above their roots, which deteriorate and collapse. Was easily able to remove long sections of their roots (5-7 inches thick) with the DeWalt. I positively hate to use a corded jig saw anymore...they almost always catch on something as I try to turn it and zip zip zip, the saw veers off the cut line. Fixed shop machines are all on AC cords, because the tool stays in place while the workpiece moves. If the tool has to move, then I really prefer battery power. For drilling concrete, nothing like an AC powered hammer drill, I don't think battery power works for that.

All this of course is personal preference, and I'm not using tools all day long either. Lots of different points of view on this.
 

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Theo
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All this of course is personal preference, and I'm not using tools all day long either. Lots of different points of view on this.
In case anyone has the wrong idea, I am well aware it is personal preference, and I have no problems with that. If you've got the money to spare, and that's how you want to spend it, have at it. Just not my preference. And, if I used yard tools, I would prefer gas powered, again my personal preference. Like my signature says, I don't try to recommend doing things my way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
In case anyone has the wrong idea, I am well aware it is personal preference, and I have no problems with that. If you've got the money to spare, and that's how you want to spend it, have at it. Just not my preference. And, if I used yard tools, I would prefer gas powered, again my personal preference. Like my signature says, I don't try to recommend doing things my way.
“Your shop; your tools, your rules.”

You have to pick the solution that works for you based on how you work and the types of projects you’re working on.
 

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“Your shop; your tools, your rules.”

You have to pick the solution that works for you based on how you work and the types of projects you’re working on.
Exactly.
 

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I got a hand held band saw with a tool package. I can't see any use for woodworking, but when it comes to cutting metal it's fantastic. Need to cut re-bar? Goes right through. Works great on thick wires that are too thick to cut with hand tools. Conduit, metal trim, bolts, all kinds of stuff in daily use. Mounting it is a waste since you eliminated the most useful feature, portability.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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Theo
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Mounting it is a waste since you eliminated the most useful feature, portability.
For me, mounting it is the only way it is of use to me, for what I use it for. If I hadn't, it would have been useless to me.
 

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I have three cordless drills. A Bosch which I don't like, a Milwaukee which is my favorite, and a Black & Decker and for a cheap drill it has been great. I have had the B&D for around five years.
 

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All my cordless tools are along this line.
 

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