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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
at this point there is SO MUCH BAD INFORMATION IN THIS THREAD that it would be safer for a MOD to PLEASE NUKE THIS THREAD. Seriously, it's a safety hazard.
I agree that this thread is filled with not only bad information but life-and-property damaging misinformation.

Perhaps the moderator could put an asterisk * on this thread and explain that contained within this thread are many convoluted and dangerous ideas in electrical shop wiring by otherwise fairly intelligent people. Explain that because of this mis-mash of erroneous information, one should ALWAYS seek the advice of a qualified electrician and not rely on opinions of those who mean well but whose ideas may burn down your house and kill you.

Steve
 
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
My last post on this thread to wind it up.

Last Sunday, I posted the question about using a 220 extension cord.
No need to rehash the various opinions expressed.

An hour ago, my electrician left and here are the results.

I have a new 100 amp box. I have four 220 outlets properly installed with 20 amp breakers. I have two exterior 120 20 amp boxes on the same circuit. I have five 120 20 amp boxes all on separate circuits. I have 4 220 plugs to wire power tools as they arrive.

The cost for labor and materials = $1163.00

Less than one week from wondering about an extension cord to having an abundance of outlets at a cost that is well-below average.

I am happy. The end.

Steve
 

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I've had a 220V extension cord running to my table saw for years. I used a Black line from Home Depot wire and standard 220 plugs. Never have had an issue with it. I recommend that you put labels along the cord for Safety.indicating that they are for 220V.
 
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I have a 220 50 amp circuit in my shop for welding which I will use for my 220 bandsaw. Is there any reason not to make a 220 extension cord that would make it easier to change out plugs?

Maybe a gang box with a couple of plugs? I wouldn't be running two tools at a time, but the convenience would be great.

I'm sure someone here has done that so would you give me some tips?

Thanks.

Steve
I am a licensed electrician, and woodworker.
Yes, you can use an 8 awg extension cord, which will be large enough to protect your EXTENSION CORD for the given circuit it is plugged into.
BUT that is only half of the problem. What is the maximum circuit size your 220v bandsaw is rated for? 20 amps? 30 amps? Putting a power tool on a 50 amp circuit (circuit breaker size, not wire size) when the tool connected is only rated to be on a 20 or 30 amp maximum circuit, will leave your BANDSAW unprotected in the event of an over-current. Check your owners manual for the bandsaw, to verify the maximum circuit size allowed for this tool. If you want to use the welder circuit to feed the bandsaw, you may need to install a smaller circuit breaker or fuses at the electrical panel, to meet requirements for the bandsaw.

Please remember this quote: Electricity has a way of weeding out the Stupid!
If you are not qualified, it is best to leave electrical work for those who are.
I am not saying this to insult you, just to caution you on the potential dangers involved.
 

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Thanks, Matt; you vindicated what I said earlier on re the oversized breaker and the potential (no pun intended) for damaging the machine...and I'm not an electrician! :)
 

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Most consumer goods supplied with a plug should have built in protection from over current. The Electric code does not cover machines with plugs, it stops at the receptacle. Power cords and extension cords only need to be big enough for the load on them, not the size of breaker on the circuit feeding them. FWIW the trip time for a 10 amp or a 50 amp breaker is just about identical in a short circuit situation. The code has plenty to say about hard-wired devices with motors to the point of complexity that the device should come with instructions for breaker size, mostly to prevent nuisance trips that could lead to dangerous work arounds by non qualified players.
Rob
 

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Rob; the Canadian Electrical Code covers EVERYTHING, just not in the volume generally available at the Electrical wholesaler (Part I), or wherever you get yours from.
Five parts in total, if I'm not mistaken...
https://blog.ansi.org/2018/01/parts-canadian-electrical-code-csa-c22/


From consumer's point of view, the CSA tests all electric products sold in Canada so as to insure that any idiot can bring something home from the store and plug it into a receptacle without regard to any other knowledge. The CEC (which may indeed be written by the CSA as your link to the blog of the American National Standards Institute seems to indicate.) is the ''code'' that applies to hard wiring in buildings. As a consumer you do not have to know about any of it, that is not your job, unless you start playing around installing or modifying any thing electrical.Those of us that are comfortable with electricity will make up a ''cheater'' extension cord with different rated male and female ends but are reluctant to recommend others do it or more to the point make one up for somebody else. By the same token when Festool had to recall vacuums because they had not passed CSA inspection but had passed UL for the USA we were not really concerned about safety but the tools had to be returned anyway. When I see blatantly dangerous information on a public forum I feel an ethical persuasion to respond, even if that makes me unpopular.
Rob
 

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I’m not an electrician,but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
 

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Rick
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I’m not an electrician,but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
 

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Actually, they don't 'Test' everything. The CSA stamp is in many cases self regulated, ie the manufacture pays CSA (big bucks!) and is allowed to uh, do their own due diligence.
I posted a comment here about a guy that blew the interior of his condo up* with a butane stove of some sort. OK; the backstory is that ALLEGEDLY he had just bought this butane sppliance from Crappy T...
Apparently this device has been recalled in Australia, US, and the UK. How come CSA and /or any other Federal agency hasn't pulled this thing off the market?
Just to be clear, CSA is a PRIVATE organization, according to a recent Legal decision, not a Gov't agency.

* The device started burning and the owner ran into the bathroom to get a towel to smother it. That's when the butane tank exploded! He was unhurt but the force of the blast moved the exterior condo wall outwards a full inch. Lots of water damage from the sprinkler system as well. The article in the local paper said that the device promoted itself as for indoor and outdoor use.
So. CSA? Their stamp and $2.50 will get you a coffee.
 
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