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Good morn all,

I'm building an 18 foot Grand Banks dory (first one) and a woodworking friend made a brilliant suggestion about using a router for various cuts. For example, finger joints and tongues and grooves. His suggestion moved the project for the unsure to the possible. In my research on routers, I came across your forum and look forward to your responses.

Another cut I am considered is a curved line along the bottom which creates the dory shape. The bottom is created by glueing 5 boards side by side (i.e., tongue and groove) to create a 14 foot long by 34 inch wide piece. The angle of the cut is 26.56. This angle matches the angle of timbers or ribs and planks attached to both the bottom and timbers to create the sides of the dory. The base is 3/4 inch thick white oak.

I think the bottom would be too big to place on a router table. However, I was considering creating a plywood template to guide the router. What suggestions do you have for making a 26.56-degree cut with a hand-held router following the template? Chamfer or flush-trim? I am a routing newbie so the more detail, the better. I need to buy a router also.

PS - I over-zealously built a solar kiln to dry wood for this project. While I cannot yet share web sites. Go to Instructables web site and search for solar kiln, if interested. It really works well.

Thanks, Bob
 

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Doug
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the angle could be made by putting a wedge shaped piece or shims under the router base to tip the router to the desired angle. You could then just use a straight cutter.

As for following the pattern, you could try to make an edge guide that would keep the router base lined up in the proper oreintation for the cut. You'd have to try a couple of test cuts to see how consistent an angle you get.
 

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Welcome, Bob!
Another approach would be to have a carbide shop grind you a custom bit, assuming you don't mind paying a bit for it. (Sorry, no pun intended.)
This is where I'd go, based on what's available up here in B.C.
Quality Saw and Knife Ltd.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Doug, Jigs, and Dan,

Thanks for all your suggestions; they definitely give me ideas to work with. I'm checking pricing with Quality Saw and Knife. Thanks again.
 

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Hey, Bob; sorry, I didn't mean to suggest that you couldn't get the same thing Stateside. Avoiding duties and all that. :)
You might want to Google for some U.S. competitors (?), just to be sure you're not overpaying after shipping etc. Good luck, eh!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No worries. I'm not afraid of Canadians. My mother is one. Born on the island of Fogo off the north coast of Newfoundland. That heritage may be one of the deep-seated reasons for my dory build.

One of my bad Canadian jokes is that Canada used to be spelled "CND." But the Canadians used to spell it: C eh! N eh! D eh!

Thank you so much for the contact. Who knew that someone could manufacture a bit just like you need? Take care, doryBob
 

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Bob, rather than try to make T&G you could use a router with a straight bit to make a groove for a spline instead. As long as all the curves are the same a router with edge guide on it should follow the shape close enough for each edge to use something like 1/4" plywood for a spline.
 

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Good one, eh!

No worries. I'm not afraid of Canadians. My mother is one. Born on the island of Fogo off the north coast of Newfoundland. That heritage may be one of the deep-seated reasons for my dory build.

One of my bad Canadian jokes is that Canada used to be spelled "CND." But the Canadians used to spell it: C eh! N eh! D eh!

Thank you so much for the contact. Who knew that someone could manufacture a bit just like you need? Take care, doryBob
Heh...
I've been having custom cutters made for projects for years...and not by choice.
When I've taken a very old trim moulding into a millwork shop (that specializes in making custom mouldings) to have matching new material made, they've always front loaded the price with the cost of grinding a custom cutter head for the moulding m/c. Ouch! I didn't even get to keep the cutter!!!
 

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Who knew that someone could manufacture a bit just like you need? Take care, doryBob
Hi Bob,

I just ordered two sets of customized stile & rail bit set from a Chinese company for making kitchen cabinet doors. This company claims that they can make any bits you specifies. You design, they make it.

For the customized stile & rail bit sets I ordered, they charge $46 for each set + shipping. Cannot complain for this price. But I haven't received the bits yet, so cannot tell the quality. The name of the company is "kangmingjian", you may have a try.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
great minds think alike

Bob, rather than try to make T&G you could use a router with a straight bit to make a groove for a spline instead. As long as all the curves are the same a router with edge guide on it should follow the shape close enough for each edge to use something like 1/4" plywood for a spline.
The plans also called for a spline but I was considering T&G. T&G would provide one less avenue for leaks but I would lose ~1/2 inch of board width per board. As I have not used either technique and will have to buy a bit for either, let me know you think way is easier than the other. Thanks.
 

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T&G would be little if any different than a spline. The tongue is a spline but only on one side. As I said, as long as both boards follow the same curves, either system should work. Originally I suggested a straight bit but a slot cutter would work better. It and a T&G set would have guide bearings to follow the edges. The bit wouldn't necessarily stay the same distance from the top or bottom edge as it passes around curves but should follow the same path from board to board.
By the way, fibreglass resin makes excellent wood glue. It's waterproof, many times stronger than the wood, and it fills gaps.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all. Visited a local woodworking tool shop; he encouraged me to build a sled. I will attempt and see if it works. A router vertical and tool angled sure seems like the way to go but I will attempt the inverse. take care, DB
 
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