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I purchased at our local sawmill a large black walnut slab that had been air-dried for 35 years after being cut in southern Ontario, Canada. I sanded the slab on both sides to 220 grit and then treated it with several coats of hemp seed oil and natural bees wax. It measures 73" long, 14" wide, 1" to 1/2" thick, and stands 19' tall. Our local welder made the 3" wide rolled steel legs. All of the bark remained on the table. This is my first black walnut coffee table and I think it is a gorgeous piece of work, mainly by nature with a little help from me! Bill Major
 

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Bill
What beautiful piece of wood,nice job of bring out the beauty and mounting it
 

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I like this Bill, and yes You are right a great way to bring out the beauty of the wood in its natural looking state
 

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That looks really great, Bill - I am amazed that the bark is still adhering after 35 years. I am busy making a rustic bench and table with natural edges, from Australian Blackwood, and my problem is that some of the bark has come off easily, but most is sticking really tight, and I am battling to remove it without damaging the underlying hard edge - has anyone got any ideas on this?
 

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Thanks for your response, Rob. I have had good results from simply gluing bark on that comes off. I have found it adheres well if I get it on the original spot accurately. Good luck in bark keeping. Billy Boy
 

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Rob, if you don't have the bark to glue back on and have to remove the rest, possibly an angle grinder with a stiff wire wheel or cup brush might remove the bulk but you would want to stop short of the sapwood I would think. Once you get close to having all the bark off you might want to change to a softer wire or start chiseling at that point.
 

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Thanks for the tip Bill - I'll try that next time, as I've already thrown out the stuff that came off. And thanks Charles, I will try the method you suggest, and also possibly a hot air gun. - Rob
 
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