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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I’m about to embark on my first project and am looking to make this coffee side table below.

I don’t have a table saw (or router table) to do the mitred/beveled 45 degree cuts so I was thinking of using my plunge router (AEG MF 1400 KE) to do the bevel cuts.

I was planning to cut everything down to size using my circular saw and straight edge. Then do the final bevel cuts using a large V groove bit. I work on some heavy duty saw horses (Toughbuilt C700) and an MDF top. The V groove bit I am looking at is from CMT and has a diameter of 38mm ( 1.5”) and has a mitred cut depth of 19mm, which is just deep enough for the 18mm plywood I want to use.

Has anyone used a V groove of this diameter by hand before? Is it safe to do so taking about 10 passes? Is this method accurate enough with a straight edge?
Thanks!

Furniture Table Shelf Rectangle Shelving
 

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That's stretching things a bit on safety. You might consider making a simple router table with a piece of ply, with an opening in it. I suggest making it with two pieces of ply, 12mm on top, 18mm below. For furniture, I suggest one meter long by about 75cm wide.. Cut both to the exact same size. Buy the flattest ply you can find. You can take a straight edge with you to check. Small errors will cancel each other pretty much when you put the table together.

Order a router mounting plate and cut a hole in the thin sheet just a hair larger than the plate. It is possible to cut that opening with a router with a spiral bit--more on that later.. Lay the thin ply on top of the thick and mark a second opening about 10-12mm smaller than the top. This will give you lip to set the plate on. Here's a plate from Kreg tools, USA. Perhaps another Aussie member can suggest a better source for you.
Product Font Automotive tire Circle Auto part


Once you get the openings right, you can glue the two layers together. Spread the glue very evenly on both surfaces. Use screws or clamps to hold them in alignment as the glue sets.

You can run screws up through the lip so you can level the plate with the top of the table. or use Kreg levelers if available. Here's how the screws work.
Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Diagram


If you use a screw, move the arrow in the illustration slightly to the right, coming up through the lip. This drawing shows MDF, but Ply work well and is cheap.

You can use a really straight piece of 2x lumber as a fence. Cut an opening to recess the bit. Given a choice, I'd make a fence with 1x hardwood that is very flat, and attach a second piece to form an L shape. Then cut about a 2 inch opening in each piece for the bit to go in. Wax the whole thing with pure paste wax with no silicon additives, and polish it like mad. This will make your workpiece slide nicely.

One last thing, buy some painter's tape and tape both sides of anything you're going to cut with that circular saw. That will reduce the chipping and splintering quite a bit. Cut through the back side so the up cut of the blade will leave a fairly clean cut.

It's really a pretty easy project, and it will all but eliminate risk with a large bit, and dramatically increase the precision of your cuts.

And welcome to the Forum.
 

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I've never done it and sounds a little dangerous. Make some dry runs before you turn it on. A round over bit would be a lot easier to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses.
I’ll try making the 45 degree bevel joins using my circular saw and straight edge instead. I wasn’t sure about how accurate one could make beveled joins with a circular saw so thought a plunge router could be used instead. I’ll look at investing in a digital angle gauge for the saw and see how I go.
I’ve got a 1/2” shank 30 degree small chamfer bit I’ll use for the exposed edges instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's stretching things a bit on safety. You might consider making a simple router table with a piece of ply, with an opening in it. I suggest making it with two pieces of ply, 12mm on top, 18mm below. For furniture, I suggest one meter long by about 75cm wide.. Cut both to the exact same size. Buy the flattest ply you can find. You can take a straight edge with you to check. Small errors will cancel each other pretty much when you put the table together.

Order a router mounting plate and cut a hole in the thin sheet just a hair larger than the plate. It is possible to cut that opening with a router with a spiral bit--more on that later.. Lay the thin ply on top of the thick and mark a second opening about 10-12mm smaller than the top. This will give you lip to set the plate on. Here's a plate from Kreg tools, USA. Perhaps another Aussie member can suggest a better source for you.
View attachment 399953

Once you get the openings right, you can glue the two layers together. Spread the glue very evenly on both surfaces. Use screws or clamps to hold them in alignment as the glue sets.

You can run screws up through the lip so you can level the plate with the top of the table. or use Kreg levelers if available. Here's how the screws work.
View attachment 399954

If you use a screw, move the arrow in the illustration slightly to the right, coming up through the lip. This drawing shows MDF, but Ply work well and is cheap.

You can use a really straight piece of 2x lumber as a fence. Cut an opening to recess the bit. Given a choice, I'd make a fence with 1x hardwood that is very flat, and attach a second piece to form an L shape. Then cut about a 2 inch opening in each piece for the bit to go in. Wax the whole thing with pure paste wax with no silicon additives, and polish it like mad. This will make your workpiece slide nicely.

One last thing, buy some painter's tape and tape both sides of anything you're going to cut with that circular saw. That will reduce the chipping and splintering quite a bit. Cut through the back side so the up cut of the blade will leave a fairly clean cut.

It's really a pretty easy project, and it will all but eliminate risk with a large bit, and dramatically increase the precision of your cuts.

And welcome to the Forum.
Thanks. Might give this a try. Looks like I could turn this into a bench top version and take it all apart when I’m finished using it.
 

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PS...Your Milwaukee M12 should be able to cut a 45° bevel. The max bevel for the M12 Fuel is 50°
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah I know it does bevel cuts. It’s just from what I’ve read using a circular saw for 45 degree bevel joins seems rather inaccurate and inconsistent for joinery. Many people still have trouble with a table saw, let alone using a handheld circular saw.
 

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Well, I should have read this post before responding to the original. You have thought it out and realize that the 45 degree will be difficult. You also realize that it could be dangerous. Build the router table and be sure to add feather boards to both the top and the fence. This way it will keep the work tight to the table. Again I will stress to get a pocket hole jig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I should have read this post before responding to the original. You have thought it out and realize that the 45 degree will be difficult. You also realize that it could be dangerous. Build the router table and be sure to add feather boards to both the top and the fence. This way it will keep the work tight to the table. Again I will stress to get a pocket hole jig.
Thanks. I’ve got a pocket hole jig :). Been using extensively on my campervanbuild.

I’ve stayed away from it here as it looks rather ugly and the furniture I’m trying to copy doesn’t use it at all, even on their bigger pieces. I gather they use some type of biscuit or doweling system. On the mitred joins.
 
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