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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the router is oldish. I do not care. I want to learn to use it. I will not buy any new one. I am old school collector of tools I want to regularly use. I have many, some powered and some not.

So first I am looking for the instruction booklet / manual / use guide or such publication for a very similar model to see what I need to work with the router. A catalog of attachments of any brand which could be used or adapted will be useful to me. My friend has 3 general books on routing so I do not need such unless they are specific to this model router. Please see the photos.

Metal Grey Machine Iron Space
Metal Machine Iron Steel Composite material


Thanks in advance and I am glad to have found this forum. See photos attached and please tell me what is attached to the working end of the router for safe use.
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum. Check here for reference see if your router is mentioned
 

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Theo
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please tell me what is attached to the working end of the router for safe use.
Common sense. You keep away from the whirly part.
 

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Routers are great, but dangerous tools. While it's nice to have the instruction booklet, basically you have an on/off switch, and on some routers, a speed control.

It looks like you don't have a plastic base on your router, and that suggests it was once used in a router table. Home made router tables are pretty easy to make with a flat sheet of plywood.

The most important accessory will be bits and a working collet (which holds the bit in place). It looks like your collet is a quarter inch, and unless you have the half inch collet somewhere, that is going to limit what you can do with it. It is often very difficult to find new collets that fit older routers. We often have visitors looking for collets who are unable to find one.

Those books you have include all the information you should have about safely using a router. If, for example, you use your router in the wrong direction relative to the grain of the wood, it will be hard to avoid tear out. You can ask questions and read about that here, or you can spend a few hours reading the initial chapters of one of those books.

The router is an amazing versatile tool, and the later chapters in those books will show you many techniques and jigs that will let you tap into the machine's many abilities. Some will show you how make a simple table to mount it in. It will cover safety as well, because things like finger amputation and deep gashes in body parts happen in an instant with hand held routers. You might want to read about avoiding that too.

I don't mean to discourage you from learning and using your router. Just not sure that what you're asking for is going to provide you with the information needed to safely use your router. And unless you have a working and reliable collet, no router is safe to use.

As an example, your router has a bit completely improperly inserted in the collet. Bits are supposed to be fully inserted, then backed out about 1/8th inch, then tighten the collet.

Collets are precision devices. See picture. It consists of two parts, the nut, the visible part, and the collet itself, which as you turn down the nut, squeezes its grip on the shaft (shank) of the bit. The difference between locked and open is a few thousandths of an inch, so any imperfections, weakness, oil, rust put you in danger from a flying bit rotating at 20,000 rpm. I've also attached a picture on routing directions, just to give you a heads up.

397241
397240
 

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I know the router is oldish. I do not care. I want to learn to use it. I will not buy any new one. I am old school collector of tools I want to regularly use. I have many, some powered and some not.

So first I am looking for the instruction booklet / manual / use guide or such publication for a very similar model to see what I need to work with the router. A catalog of attachments of any brand which could be used or adapted will be useful to me. My friend has 3 general books on routing so I do not need such unless they are specific to this model router. Please see the photos.

View attachment 397233 View attachment 397234

Thanks in advance and I am glad to have found this forum. See photos attached and please tell me what is attached to the working end of the router for safe use.
Welcome to the forum, Adbaizing.
That was my first router and I still have it.
Tom is right, yours does not have the base which is black. Later I will check my files to see if I have the operation manual.
Mine has two black wooden knobs like yours so I am sure they are the original ones.
 

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G'day and welcome to the forum.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Routers are great, but dangerous tools. While it's nice to have the instruction booklet, basically you have an on/off switch, and on some routers, a speed control.

It looks like you don't have a plastic base on your router, and that suggests it was once used in a router table. Home made router tables are pretty easy to make with a flat sheet of plywood.

The most important accessory will be bits and a working collet (which holds the bit in place). It looks like your collet is a quarter inch, and unless you have the half inch collet somewhere, that is going to limit what you can do with it. It is often very difficult to find new collets that fit older routers. We often have visitors looking for collets who are unable to find one.

Those books you have include all the information you should have about safely using a router. If, for example, you use your router in the wrong direction relative to the grain of the wood, it will be hard to avoid tear out. You can ask questions and read about that here, or you can spend a few hours reading the initial chapters of one of those books.

The router is an amazing versatile tool, and the later chapters in those books will show you many techniques and jigs that will let you tap into the machine's many abilities. Some will show you how make a simple table to mount it in. It will cover safety as well, because things like finger amputation and deep gashes in body parts happen in an instant with hand held routers. You might want to read about avoiding that too.

I don't mean to discourage you from learning and using your router. Just not sure that what you're asking for is going to provide you with the information needed to safely use your router. And unless you have a working and reliable collet, no router is safe to use.

As an example, your router has a bit completely improperly inserted in the collet. Bits are supposed to be fully inserted, then backed out about 1/8th inch, then tighten the collet.

Collets are precision devices. See picture. It consists of two parts, the nut, the visible part, and the collet itself, which as you turn down the nut, squeezes its grip on the shaft (shank) of the bit. The difference between locked and open is a few thousandths of an inch, so any imperfections, weakness, oil, rust put you in danger from a flying bit rotating at 20,000 rpm. I've also attached a picture on routing directions, just to give you a heads up.

View attachment 397241 View attachment 397240
Thank you very much for the valuable information. I shall first thoroughly study the anatomy of a router. I am sure I will construct a router table after getting the collet chuck correct and the bit correctly installed. I do have some reading to do as I am not interested in any accidents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think that the number 82901 is the number for the base. The motor number might get you better search results. You might find a little more Stanley info here. Maybe you can at least identify the model number.
Thanks, yes now I know the difference between the motor and the base. The motor is90098 M , Model 02, 25000 RPM. I have learned how to seperate the motor from the base. On the shaft away from the bit and toward the motor is a place for a wrench to loosen the collet nut. So now is it reverse thread. And the base has a feature to adjust where the bit is in relation to the base. So now for safe use I will build a router table. Still looking for a manual. I do see parts and such rotor on ebay. So I am off to a good start. First I have to get my old school Craftsman Radial Arm saw running and safe. Love the old school stuff. Thanks
 

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Paul
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I doubt it would be a reverse thread but be careful, tightening an empty collet is a no-no and can damage the inner part of it!

When you do install a bit, don't put the shank in all the way, lift it out about an 1/8 inch before tightening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Welcome to the forum, Adbaizing.
That was my first router and I still have it.
Tom is right, yours does not have the base which is black. Later I will check my files to see if I have the operation manual.
Mine has two black wooden knobs like yours so I am sure they are the original ones.
I really hope to find an operation manual. I am a bit skittish about going to the manual sites for fear of a hack or scam. Is there a manual website that I can be sure will work well, Or maybe even a few. I will google manual scams to see if there is cautionary info. thanks
 
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